Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in Summerville, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in Summerville or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Medicare Summerville, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Summerville, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Summerville

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans Summerville, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Summerville is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in Summerville, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans Summerville, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance Summerville, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in Summerville. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare Summerville, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance Summerville, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage Summerville, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in Summerville, SC

Dorchester County mediates with home builder near Summerville; residents concerned

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County has agreed to a mediation settlement with builder Kolter Homes regarding The Ponds neighborhood near Summerville.Neighbors say they’re concerned, saying the builder has overdeveloped on the property, but the county disputes that, saying the original agreement was vague.“Kolter has built themselves into a corner,” homeowner Brian Riesen said. “When they ran out of land to develop, rather than hand over the amenities on those lands and give up some of thei...

DORCHESTER COUNTY, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County has agreed to a mediation settlement with builder Kolter Homes regarding The Ponds neighborhood near Summerville.

Neighbors say they’re concerned, saying the builder has overdeveloped on the property, but the county disputes that, saying the original agreement was vague.

“Kolter has built themselves into a corner,” homeowner Brian Riesen said. “When they ran out of land to develop, rather than hand over the amenities on those lands and give up some of their maximum number of homes they’re allowed to build, they asked to get rid of the amenities and ask for more homes and more land.”

The mediation agreement was approved at the last county council meeting on April 18. It was made public late on Friday. Neighbors say they like some parts of the agreement and don’t like others.

The county, meanwhile, says the mediation agreement between them and Kolter Homes is in the best long-term solution for all parties involved.

The agreement adds 50 more single-family homes, from 1,950 to 2,000 homes, along with 74 townhomes off Lotz Drive and gets rid of the requirement of apartments to be built in the subdivision.

However, some homeowners say they feel like the county has turned their back on them by signing this agreement with Kolter.

“They’re getting rid of the village center requirement, leaving less than two acres of zoned commercial but no commitment to build,” Riesen said. “They’ve eliminated the nature trails, and there’s maybe three miles of the original 18 in existence. Many of us feel Kolter has already violated and broken their contract, and the county was, up until last week, holding them accountable, and now, they’ve just decided to let Kolter do what they want, essentially.”

County Councilmember David Chinnis, in response, says the village center, which is a planned retail center, in the original agreement from 2005 was described as up to 94 acres of land to be used for that purpose, meaning there was no concrete amount of acreage specified.

“The amount is up to, or not to exceed, which is vague,” Chinnis said. “It doesn’t tell you how much there’s going to be. It tells you what it won’t be greater than.”

Chinnis also says the nature trails were not specifically mapped out when the original development was signed.

However, as part of the new agreement, Kolter must install 10 miles of walking trails and keep existing ones intact.

“There’s a picture of what we want to keep,” Chinnis said. “They talk about 10 miles of existing trails, but I don’t know if we’ve ever had them identified. For us to go back in and say, ‘You had to do this. You’ve taken this trail. You’ve got to mitigate it.’ Well, at this point in time, there’s a house on it.”

Chinnis also described the original development agreement as “horrible” and “open-ended” and is not something that would happen nowadays.

Jeff Vandewiel, the community director of the Charleston Division for Kolter Homes, released the following statement.

“Kolter Homes is pleased to have reached an agreement with Dorchester County on the planned improvements and continued development of The Ponds neighborhood. While we respect differing opinions, we believe this new shared vision will continue to ensure The Ponds is a wonderful place to call home and will benefit the greater Dorchester County community.”

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

It’s all in the family: Summerville parents and children all earn degrees from USC School of Journalism

I wanted to make sure they knew they could attend any college, but he raised three Gamecocks. CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As students turn their tassels and mark the completion of college, it will be quite an accomplishment for one Summerville family.When the youngest child graduates from the University of South Carolina in Columbia this weekend, it will mean every member of the Grimes family has a degree from the USC School of Journalism.Randy Grimes was the first to graduate in 1985. Adrianne marched in 1988. Their ol...

I wanted to make sure they knew they could attend any college, but he raised three Gamecocks.

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - As students turn their tassels and mark the completion of college, it will be quite an accomplishment for one Summerville family.

When the youngest child graduates from the University of South Carolina in Columbia this weekend, it will mean every member of the Grimes family has a degree from the USC School of Journalism.

Randy Grimes was the first to graduate in 1985. Adrianne marched in 1988. Their oldest daughter Erika earned her degree in 2018, Morgan was next in 2020, and the youngest child, Jared-Benjamin, gets his degree from the School of Journalism this weekend.

So did the Grimes’ encourage their kids to follow in their footsteps and attend USC?

“Actually, I as their mother did not, but Randy my husband, yes he did,” Adrianne said. “I wanted to make sure they knew they could attend any college, and I told them to think outside the box. But honestly, he (Randy) raised three Gamecocks. We had the 10-foot inflatable Gamecock in our house, that the kids took pictures by, and they spent time in Williams-Brice Stadium as children. So, with all of that, they grew up understanding or perceiving college and higher education as University of South Carolina.”

As for all the kids choosing to study journalism, Adrianne says that sort of came naturally.

“They used to write and produce sitcoms along with Live 5′s Raphael James’ daughter Jaydn,” Adrianne said. “I have sitcoms with these kids. And I used to tell my husband, we should send them to Disney or Nickelodeon because their stuff was really good. They would write the script, shoot, edit, and then act it out. Also, Morgan was writing books, children’s books. As soon as she started writing, she was writing books. So we have several stories she’s written that are in typing paper, folded together in staples.”

“And Erika was writing journals,” Adrianne said. “When Randy was in grad school at George Washington in D.C., she transcribed every trip we took up there. Every time we went to D.C. she wrote about it and journaled about the trip. So it was in their DNA.”

Randy and Adrianne both used to work behind the scenes at Live 5 and that’s where they met and got married.

Randy is a department head at Trident Technical College in the Film and Media Department, continuing to educate future media professionals.

The rest of the family works in public relations with agencies like the S.C Research Authority, Lowcountry Local First, and the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments.

The newest grad is still trying to decide how he wants to make his mark in the world.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Preliminary 3.3 magnitude quake jolts South Carolina

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - A relatively rare East Coast earthquake centered just northeast of South Carolina’s capital city jolted large numbers of state residents awake early Monday, rocking the Southern state at a preliminary 3.3 magnitude, authorities said.There were no immediate reports of any damages or injuries.The pre-dawn temblor lasted only seconds but a number of people took to social media to describe being shaken from sleep when the quake hit shortly after 1:30 a.m. A seismic analyst monitoring the quake for the US...

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - A relatively rare East Coast earthquake centered just northeast of South Carolina’s capital city jolted large numbers of state residents awake early Monday, rocking the Southern state at a preliminary 3.3 magnitude, authorities said.

There were no immediate reports of any damages or injuries.

The pre-dawn temblor lasted only seconds but a number of people took to social media to describe being shaken from sleep when the quake hit shortly after 1:30 a.m. A seismic analyst monitoring the quake for the USGS Geological Survey’s National Earthquake Information Center in Colorado, called it the latest in a series of shakes in recent months but stronger than usual.

“There’s definitely been a ‘swarm’ here over the past several months. It’s not like a swarm like after a large seismic event but we have had a number of them in recent months,” geophysicist Amy Vaughan with the 24-hour monitoring service told The Associated Press by phone.

Vaughan said the 3.3 magnitude is an early assessment and could change, adding the quake occurred about 1.9 miles (3.1 kilometers) below the earth’s surface near the community of Elgin. The epicenter was about 21 miles (3 kilometers) northeast of downtown Columbia, the capital city.

Those awakened reported feeling the earth shaking for several seconds and some even described what sounded like a heavy truck moving nearby. Vaughan said only an hour afterward she had reports pouring in to the quake monitoring center.

“I have not heard of any damage reports so far but have had over a thousand ... reports,” she said. “If people were sleeping they obviously would have been woken up and things might have been rattling off shelves or countertops but not the kind of shaking or intensity to cause damage of any significance.”

Still, she called it “alarming for sure” and said some lesser aftershocks were possible in coming days or weeks. She noted there were quakes of a preliminary 2.0 or higher in April and March and others going back little more than four months in the region — and a 3.3 quake last December.

She said the quake was a rather shallow one, fairly close to the surface, which made it felt, adding the area has been experiencing other shocks recently.

Two dozen minor quakes have rattled near Columbia since the end of last year, more than the 20 typically averaged by the state in an entire year, according to the South Carolina Emergency Management Division. Elgin is along a large fault system that extends from Georgia through the Carolinas and into Virginia.

Last year, the area near Jenkinsville — about 40 miles (60 kilometers) west of this group of tremors — registered six small earthquakes in over a week, with three quakes registered on a single day alone.

According to emergency management officials, about 70% of South Carolina earthquakes are located in the Middleton Place-Summerville Seismic Zone, about 12.4 miles (20 kilometers) northwest of Charleston.

In 1886, that historic coastal city was home to the largest recorded earthquake in the history of the southeastern United States, according to seismic officials. The quake, thought to have had a magnitude of at least 7, left dozens of people dead and destroyed hundreds of buildings.

That event was preceded by a series of smaller tremors over several days, although it was not known that the foreshocks were necessarily leading up to something more catastrophic until after the major quake.

___

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Work set to begin on a whopper of a warehouse in Summerville

Construction of the biggest speculative industrial project in the Charleston region kicks off this week with a groundbreaking event for the 1.1 million-square-foot development at Crossroads Logistics Center in Summerville.The site, near the Jedburg Road exit on Interstate 26, is being built out by a partnership between Citimark Realty and Pure Development. The Indianapolis companies formed Citimark Pure Charleston LLC to buy roughly 131 acres fronting I-26 for $8.75 m...

Construction of the biggest speculative industrial project in the Charleston region kicks off this week with a groundbreaking event for the 1.1 million-square-foot development at Crossroads Logistics Center in Summerville.

The site, near the Jedburg Road exit on Interstate 26, is being built out by a partnership between Citimark Realty and Pure Development. The Indianapolis companies formed Citimark Pure Charleston LLC to buy roughly 131 acres fronting I-26 for $8.75 million last year.

Their first building will eclipse by 10 percent the previous record for a local “spec” project — a 1 million-square-foot structure at the nearby Charleston Trade Center.

The Crossroads project is scheduled for completion by late 2022. Plans call for three more buildings to rise in two phases totaling an additional 1.53 million square feet at the Berkeley County site.

Wednesday’s groundbreaking will feature speakers from the State Ports Authority, operator of the Port of Charleston, as well as commercial real estate firm CBRE Inc., which is marketing the project.

The term speculative in this instance means that no tenants have been secured at the time construction begins.

While such projects continue to grow in size and scope, they still don’t approach the region’s biggest-single industrial property. That distinction belongs to the cavernous 3 million-square-foot import hub built just up I-26 in Dorchester County for retail giant Walmart.

The Crossroads project is part of a boom in speculative industrial-grade real estate deals in the Charleston area, particularly along the I-26 corridor from North Charleston to Ridgeville. Almost all of it is being driven by the need to store and sort goods that retailers are importing through Charleston.

Mike White, broker in charge of Daniel Island-based Charleston Industrial, said about 5.1 million square feet of “Class A” space is set to open by the end of this year. Most of that space will be snapped up before a certificate of occupancy is issued, he added.

“The conditions of a high demand and low volume of space available will continue,” White said.

No wonder?

CNN will feature Charleston in its upcoming fourth season of “The Wonder List with Bill Weir,” but it’s not looking to be yet another wonderful tourist piece.

The series is now part of the content catalog at CNN+, the cable network’s subscriber-based streaming service.

The four new shows will focus on “fascinating locations at a critical crossroads brought on by climate change,” according to a written statement last week.

The season kicks off April 21, on the eve of Earth Day.

Weir, who has been CNN’s climate correspondent for about a decade, will anchor reports from Montana, Greenland and Hawaii as well as coastal South Carolina.

In its statement, the network suggested that the Charleston episode will look at the “surging seas and frequent floods” that “batter one of America’s most storied cities and the critical reminders of its slave trade past.”

Material event

A North Charleston-based global textile manufacturer’s next stop in its 232-year journey is in the Lone Star State.

AstenJohnson, which makes specialty fabrics for industrial customers such as paper mill operators, recently picked Waco, Texas, for a new 220,000-square-foot plant that will employ 36 workers.

The $40 million factory is expected to open in 2023 and will make “nonwovens,” a widely used material formed by bonding synthetic fibers through either a chemical, mechanical or heating process.

In this case, the specialty textiles to be made in Waco will be sold to manufacturers in the automotive, aerospace, filtration and piping industries, among others.

A local economic development group provided the 36-acre plant site, and the company qualified for $2 million in public financial assistance from the city and county, according to a report in the Waco Tribune-Herald.

“The long-term prospects for our nonwovens business are excellent,” CEO Kevin Frank said in a written statement. “Customer demand for our products has only been growing. This investment will allow us to satisfy the increasing demand and continue to offer more products and innovation.”

The global company expanded into the nonwoven sector when it acquired a Missouri-based manufacturer in 2014. It bought another plant a few years ago in New Hampshire.

AstenJohnson traces its corporate ancestry to a family-owned wire business that was started in 1790 in Manchester, England. It’s now headquartered on Corporate Road. Its only South Carolina plant is in Clinton.

1M milestone

Boeing South Carolina’s science-and-math-focused education program has learned that it’s reached a major milestone.

The manufacturer, which makes its 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston, announced last week that more than 1 million students had participated in DreamLearners, a STEM-heavy instructional outreach it launched about 10 years ago in the Palmetto State.

As part of the program, school kids have toured the Boeing South Carolina campus and have had the program come to them in their classrooms. During the COVID-19 pandemic, DreamLearners went virtual.

Students do a hands-on paper airplane activity and learn about careers in the core STEM elements of science, technology, engineering and math, as well as advanced manufacturing and aerospace.

More than 7,600 Boeing employees have volunteered to participate in DreamLearners, the company said.

Boeing celebrated hitting the seven-figure milestone last week at North Charleston Elementary School, not far from its 787 Dreamliner campus.

Hey, bow

A Charleston-born business built from formal-wear feathers made famous by celebrities has fashioned a new formation to fete its decade-old creations.

Brackish, a bow-tie retailer that launched after groomsmen’s wedding gifts made from turkey feathers proved popular, is toasting its 10 years in business with a new neckwear adornment called “Cheers.”

The latest version features a turkey feather in the center, a nod to the original design. Its colors — blue, white, green and others — are meant to reflect the Palmetto State from the salty Atlantic to the rolling hills of the Upstate.

Owners Ben Ross and Jeff Plotner, friends from their college days at Wofford, say the commemorative and limited-edition tie “instantly invokes good times with family, friends and, in this case, feathers.”

Lounging about

Edwin Hughes figures he’s spent about half of his adult life at Charlotte Douglas International.

As a member of American Airlines’ Executive Platinum club, he is a frequent visitor to the big Queen City airport, which serves a major hub for the carrier.

Now he has a new place to spend his layovers. A passenger lounge concept that’s already available at Charleston International recently opened its doors at Charlotte Douglas.

The Airports Dimensions-operated Club CLT in Concourse A made its debut March 30. It’s open daily from 5 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and seats 105. Hughes, who lives in West Ashley, said it’s a welcome refuge from the hustle and bustle at the North Carolina travel waystation that accommodated more than 43 million passengers in 2021.

“If you’ve got a long layover and you need to get some work done or just relax, it’s a great extra amenity,” said Hughes, who travels about 40 weeks out of the year. “If you fly out of Charleston, you’ll either have to go through Charlotte or Atlanta on most flights, so it’s nice to have this place to go if you’re an American flyer.”

Anyone can access the lounge with a $45 day pass. Club CLT is also available to Priority Pass members, a lounge access membership that starts at $99 a year. Customers in the lounge are limited to a three-hour maximum stay. Food and drink are complimentary with entry.

The Club concept also has outposts in Atlanta, Baltimore, Cincinnati, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh and 10 other U.S. airports. Club CHS at Charleston International opened in mid-2019.

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of The Post and Courier contributed to this report.

Business Brief: Chick-fil-A in Summerville temporarily closed for renovations

Summerville’s Chick-fil-A has temporarily closed for a five-week renovation at its Main Street location, according to a report by The Post and Courier.The popular fast food restaurant closed its doors on April 16.The renovations will prepare the inside of the restaurant for sit-down customers once again, The Post and Courier reported. Chick-fil-A’s indoor dining room has been closed to customers since the COVID-19 outbreak and ensuing shutdowns began in 2020. The restaurant has since expanded its drive-through servi...

Summerville’s Chick-fil-A has temporarily closed for a five-week renovation at its Main Street location, according to a report by The Post and Courier.

The popular fast food restaurant closed its doors on April 16.

The renovations will prepare the inside of the restaurant for sit-down customers once again, The Post and Courier reported. Chick-fil-A’s indoor dining room has been closed to customers since the COVID-19 outbreak and ensuing shutdowns began in 2020. The restaurant has since expanded its drive-through services to accommodate customers.

Other Chick-fil-A locations in the north area include one on St. James Avenue in Goose Creek, as well as Northwoods Mall, University Boulevard, Dorchester Road and Rivers Avenue locations in North Charleston.

South Carolina workforce improving

The Department of Employment and Workforce announced that employment numbers continue to move in positive directions.

The number of people participating in the labor force — i.e. individuals who are employed or actively searching for work — is larger than it has ever been at approximately 2,384,360.

The department announced that while the labor force participation rate remains at 57.2 percent, there are nearly 68,000 more people in the labor force than pre-pandemic, and the South Carolina Labor Force Participation Task Force is continuing to examine the state’s challenges and opportunities to increase the rate.

The agency reports the number of people employed is 2,303,592. That is 54,239 more South Carolinians working than pre-pandemic and the unemployment rate inched down to 3.4 percent in March from February’s rate of 3.5 percent.

“Our agency continues to do its part to provide connections between jobseekers and employers,” S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce executive director Dan Ellzey said in a press release. “Earlier this week, we announced the launch of the SC Works Veterans Portal which helps military personnel transition to civilian jobs. This is an important tool to help individuals with strong work and soft skills find jobs in South Carolina with one of the many employers who are looking for skilled candidates.”

Knight’s Companies promotions

Summerville based concrete business Knight’s Companies announced multiple promotions, including a new general manager.

Joe Thomas has become general manager of Knight’s Precast, Tekna Corporation and Sovereign Steel. Thomas comes to the role with 32 years of experience in the precast concrete industry.

Previously, Thomas was the regional manager of Knight’s Precast and focused on plant operations. Now, in addition to plant operations, he will manage the estimating and engineering aspects of Knight’s Precast, Tekna Corporation and Sovereign Steel.

Joining Knight’s Precast in 1999, Thomas was originally drawn to Knight’s because of its reputation as a growing family business. During his time with the company, he has watched it triple in size. To maintain that growth and success, he believes consistent communication is key, according to a Knight’s press release.

Knight’s Companies also announced that Jodi McCall was hired as human resource director.

Previously, McCall was the human resources manager at Home Telecom. She joins Knight’s with 25 years of experience in human resources.

McCall will work with Pete Knight, CEO of Knight’s Companies, and executive management to develop employee services, policies and programs geared toward creating a stronger sense of community at Knight’s. Currently managing a team of four human resources professionals, she will lead the implementation of programs to enhance the employee experience.

Knight’s Companies offers septic, ready-mix concrete, precast concrete, prestressed concrete, steel reinforcement products, trucking and concrete pumping services to commercial and residential customers in South Carolina and Georgia.

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