Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in Rock Hill, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in Rock Hill or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Medicare Rock Hill, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rock Hill, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Rock Hill

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans Rock Hill, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Rock Hill is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in Rock Hill, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans Rock Hill, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance Rock Hill, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in Rock Hill. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare Rock Hill, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance Rock Hill, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage Rock Hill, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in Rock Hill, SC

New Deal and No Deal in Panthers-Rock Hill Bankruptcy Case

ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper has taken a new approach in the bankruptcy case of his real estate company that paves an easy path for contractors but a more difficult road for taxpayers. Tepper’s GT Real Estate filed a new reorganization plan that excludes the original offers for Rock Hill and York County. GT Real Estate claims the city and county have chosen difficult litigation and unreasonable demands instead.In the ...

ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper has taken a new approach in the bankruptcy case of his real estate company that paves an easy path for contractors but a more difficult road for taxpayers. Tepper’s GT Real Estate filed a new reorganization plan that excludes the original offers for Rock Hill and York County. GT Real Estate claims the city and county have chosen difficult litigation and unreasonable demands instead.

In the new filing, GT Real Estate claims both the city and county do not have claims for the $20 million and $21 million, respectively, contributed to the project, saying the money was transferred without any obligations.

“Unfortunately, the City and County have instead chosen to pursue a flawed litigation strategy, making exorbitant and unreasonable demands well in excess of their entitlements,” a GTRE spokesperson wrote in a statement.

The new plan submitted by GT Real Estate would force the city and county to pursue debts through the normal bankruptcy court proceedings. According to the filing, York County was seeking to recoup more than $80 million, including $43 million in damages to Mt. Gallant Road and $38 million in lost tax revenue. WBTV already reported Rock Hill was pursuing a Rule 2004 hearing to open up GT Real Estate to discovery and has also filed a new complaint seeking damages from GT Real Estate and accusing the company of fraud.

The new reorganization plan would still need to be approved by a judge.

The new filing comes on the heels of a WBTV Investigation that raises questions about whether the bond agreement between Tepper’s company and Rock Hill was doomed to fail from the start. Last week, the City of Rock Hill filed its own complaint alleging Tepper’s GT Real Estate had fraudulent intent throughout the negotiations that ultimately fell apart.

The entire deal collapsed with construction stopping, defaults issued and GT Real Estate filing bankruptcy all in the span of six months in 2022.

In the most recent reorganization plan filed earlier this month, GT Real Estate structured a plan it claimed would pay almost every debtor back completely.

• $60.5 million in cash funded into a settlement trust for the benefit of contractors, subcontractors and general unsecured creditors, which GTRE believes will be sufficient to pay all allowed claims in full;

• $21.165 million in cash to reimburse York County for all amounts it contributed to the project, plus interest; and

• $20.0 million or more from the available net proceeds (after clean-up and senior claims) of the sale of real property to make payments to the City of Rock Hill.

The amount for the contractors and subcontractors is the only portion that remains intact in the new plan.

In response, on Wednesday Rock Hill City Council voted last Wednesday to file a complaint against GT Real Estate that sent a strong message they would choose a different option than the one put forward by Tepper’s company.

The complaint claims Tepper’s GT Real Estate firm had “conflicting financial demands” by wanting more public investment but refusing to backstop the bonds in case the project went south. The city says GT Real Estate wanted $225 million in bond proceeds but was only willing to contribute $500 million in private investments.

The city is seeking a jury trial and is demanding actual damages of $20 million, compensatory and punitive damages, and rights to the property now controlled by GTRE.

On Tuesday, a WBTV Investigation raised questions about whether the project was doomed from the start. The investigation found the amount of bond money agreed to by Rock Hill was far more public investment than other similar projects and simultaneously sidestepped key oversight steps.

Despite the concerns outlined by the City of Rock Hill in their own complaint, the city still signed an agreement after more than eight months of trying and failing to get the vital material it needed from GT Real Estate to issue the bonds.

In response to WBTV’s report a spokesperson for Rock Hill wrote in an email ““The City Council is looking forward eagerly to the day judgment is rendered on the facts that will be presented in court.”

FULL STATEMENT FROM GTRE:

Press Statement

“GTRE filed an amended Plan of Reorganization today to address the reactions of stakeholders to the original plan filed in August. GTRE’s original Plan of Reorganization would have paved the way for all creditors, including the City and County, to receive generous payouts on an expedited basis. Trade creditors have engaged constructively with GTRE, and their treatment under the amended Plan of Reorganization remains unchanged. Unfortunately, the City and County have instead chosen to pursue a flawed litigation strategy, making exorbitant and unreasonable demands well in excess of their entitlements. Under the amended Plan of Reorganization, the City and the County are treated similarly in accordance with their rights under the Bankruptcy Code and without the concessions that had been provided previously. These modifications are intended to prevent the City and County from causing further harm to the confirmation process and delaying payment of the $60.5 million that has been reserved to pay trade creditors.”

On Wednesday, York County issued the following statement:

“Late Tuesday, September 13th, GT Real Estate LLC filed a modified Plan of Reorganization in the Delaware Bankruptcy Court. The County is still reviewing the modified plan. However, it is self-evident the modified plan is yet another example of broken promises from these Tepper entities. To date, the Debtor in its public pleadings, and others have made repeated assurances that the misappropriated $21 million of York County taxpayer money would be repaid. York County is disappointed these parties again appear to be going back on their word. To be clear, the County has not engaged in any unreasonable conduct in regard to the Debtor. Rather, the County has only sought reasonable compensation for its real and legitimate claims and the damages GT Real Estate and the other Tepper entities have left in their wake. The County will continue to pursue its claims and aggressively protect its interests and the interests of its citizens and taxpayers.”

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Gun found at Rock Hill HS, marking third in 3 days within S.C. school district

The gun was found inside a student’s car on Wednesday after deputies received a tip.This gun was found today at Rock Hill High School. The school district says it stepped up security because of the recent incidents with guns.ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - A gun was found in a student’s car at Rock Hill High School on Wednesday, the York County Sheriff’s Office said.This comes after two guns had already been found at schools within the district this academic year, with all three now being discovered within t...

The gun was found inside a student’s car on Wednesday after deputies received a tip.

This gun was found today at Rock Hill High School. The school district says it stepped up security because of the recent incidents with guns.

ROCK HILL, S.C. (WBTV) - A gun was found in a student’s car at Rock Hill High School on Wednesday, the York County Sheriff’s Office said.

This comes after two guns had already been found at schools within the district this academic year, with all three now being discovered within the past three days.

Deputies searched the student’s vehicle after receiving a tip.

The student was confronted and took off running. Deputies are still attempting to track down that student.

”We will be more proactive in addressing safety and security in all of our schools,” Rock Hill Schools district spokesperson Lindsay Machak said. “When it comes to district administration, this is the kind of stuff that keeps us up at night. This is the thing that worries us. This is the thing we are consistently, constantly worried about and trying to improve upon.”

The school district has already put some measures, such as random searches, into place to improve security. The district is pushing the 24-hour tipline that everyone can use.

Schools in the district have metal detectors, but they aren’t currently meant for everyday use. The school board could elect to change that.

“The number one goal is to make sure that everyone in that building is safe and secure,” board chairwoman and Rock Hill Schools parent Helena Miller said.

Miller said that the board will have an agenda item discussing the firearm-related incidents and what it can do to address them.

“What other measurements can we take? And that is the next step to have a conversation about what is the next step that can be taken in order to make sure that we are on the forefront,” she said. “If it was as easy as implementing X and it would all be magically fixed, every school district in the entire country would do that.”

Miller says the district and board have heard from parents, community members and stakeholders about what those groups would like to see done. She says everything will be weighed to create a fix that will best serve the district.

The chairwoman says the board will definitely have an agenda item discussing these incidents and what the board can do to address them. She wants the community to come together to help fight this issue. It is not just a school issue--she says--it is also a community issue and a home issue. “Everyone needs to get involved,” she says.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Rock Hill, SC, Sues Carolina Panthers' Owner Over Canceled $800M Facility

The City of Rock Hill, S.C., has filed an adversarial lawsuit to recover $20 million plus damages from developers of the now-canceled Carolina Panthers $800-million headquarters and practice facility.The Sept. 7 filing in federal court in Delaware is part of ongoing bankruptcy proceedings for GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC, created by Panthers owner David Tepper to manage the 234...

The City of Rock Hill, S.C., has filed an adversarial lawsuit to recover $20 million plus damages from developers of the now-canceled Carolina Panthers $800-million headquarters and practice facility.

The Sept. 7 filing in federal court in Delaware is part of ongoing bankruptcy proceedings for GT Real Estate Holdings, LLC, created by Panthers owner David Tepper to manage the 234-acre mixed-use project in Rock Hill.

The city, which had agreed in 2019 to issue $225 million in bonds to fund infrastructure improvements at the site, accuses GTRE of intentionally breaching its contractual obligations, claiming the company “failed to timely provide the necessary documents and information as to the development of the Project, failed to sign and deliver the documents necessary for the issuance of tax-exempt bonds and twice prevented the City from proceeding to an initial bond closing.”

In January 2022, 18 months after the Mascaro Construction/Barton Mallow CM-at-risk joint venture broke ground on the project, the lawsuit contends, GTRE told the city to cancel the bond sale, and that the project would be scaled back to include only the centerpiece five-story, 600,000-sq-ft indoor practice facility.

GTRE halted construction in March, saying at the time that “our partners have been unable to contribute the agreed-upon investment to fund the construction of the public infrastructure.”

Although Rock Hill offered to help find ways to keep the project alive, including a $135-million bond offering, the Panthers ultimately pulled the plug in mid-April. GTRE filed for bankruptcy protection less than two months later.

“GTRE’s conduct in breaching the contract is characterized by dishonesty in fact, unfair dealing, or the unlawful appropriation of the City’s property,” the filing says. “GTRE is liable to the City for breach of contract accompanied by fraud.” The filing also requests a jury trial to settle the matter.

In a separate filing to the bankruptcy court, GTRE attorneys responded that Rock Hill’s lawsuit is based on “false and incendiary claims,” and that the company had invested $240 million in the project. It was only after the city failed to meet its obligations under “unambiguous” and “good faith” agreements with GTRE, the filing claims, that the project had to be canceled.

The amount sought by Rock Hill’s lawsuit is similar to the minimum amount it would receive from net proceeds of the property’s sale, under GTRE’s proposed restructuring plan filed in August. The plan, which has not been approved by the court, also provides nearly $61 million to settle claims from Mascaro/Barton Mallow and other contractors involved with the project.

Rock Hill schools work to feed thousands of kids every weekend who would otherwise go hungry

Rock Hill Schools has 11,386 students who qualify for free or reduced lunch. That means their families’ income is below or near the federal poverty level.ROCK HILL, S.C. — The need for free or reduced lunches in schools continues to be a significant issue for districts.In Rock Hill Schools alone officials say 11,386 students qualify for fre...

Rock Hill Schools has 11,386 students who qualify for free or reduced lunch. That means their families’ income is below or near the federal poverty level.

ROCK HILL, S.C. — The need for free or reduced lunches in schools continues to be a significant issue for districts.

In Rock Hill Schools alone officials say 11,386 students qualify for free or reduced lunch. That means their families’ income is below or near the federal poverty line.

The district says that’s 67% of its student population.

"Students within Rock Hill Schools experience a 68-hour gap between Friday afternoon and Sunday morning where they don't have any access to food," Megan Paat, Rock Hill Schools Education Foundation Executive Director said.

Dozens of volunteers with Rock Hill Schools and the Rock Hill Schools Education Foundation help feed these students each weekend.

Paat says at least 750 students are in the Back the Pack program this year, but that is expected to rise.

Bags are about $6 dollars each this year, which means it takes $230 a school year to feed one student per weekend. Inflation has impacted the cost this year.

“Our bag prices have gone up $2 per bag," Paat said.

The bags have a far reach in the community and for one volunteer it’s why she keeps coming back.

"I have had a young man I have been tutoring since first grade," Mary Scheper, Back the Pack Volunteer said. "And last year, he was in fourth grade."

Scheper is a volunteer at a local church where she tutors children.

"He always showed up to Star hungry, like most of the kids, he was a growing boy. But one day, he opened his backpack, and there was one of our bags."

Research shows that hungry students are more likely to score lower on standardized tests, repeat a grade, be suspended from school, and get sick more often.

“It helps them know that they're not alone, that there's somebody here to partner with them, and that we believe in them, and we'll do everything we can to help them be the best versions of themselves," Paat said.

The program also includes help from Rock Hill students.

"I've always wanted to be able to help kids that don't have what I have, Jaycee Gaskins, Rock Hill Schools Student said. "And I just feel like this program has helped me accomplish that in so many ways."

Rock Hill students get to help pack the bags and help order supplies for a logistics and distribution course.

"They're getting workforce development by helping with warehouse science like ordering and sorting, quality control and transportation," Patt said. "They also get OSHA certification and forklift certification.:

The students are also navigating supply chain issues in real time.

"We've had to pivot from what we ordered, and we've had delays we had to shift our pack day to day just to accommodate the change in the shipping," Paat said.

But at the end of the day—students can still find a can of green beans, an orange cup, and even a can of ravioli all getting packed up into a Ziploc and in their bags.

Gaffney football knocks Northwestern from unbeaten ranks in win at District 3 Stadium

Gaffney put together perhaps its most complete game of the season, earning a fourth win in a row over Northwestern at District 3 Stadium on Friday, and turning away Trojans, 28-7.The Indians, who lost 40-26 to South Pointe on the same field in Week 0, came back to Rock Hill on Friday night looking for redemption. Northwestern had revenge on its mind, having lost, 16-13, to Gaffney in the third round of last year’s playoffs.Gaffney had the upper hand this time around.“It wasn’t a secret that Gaffney&rsqu...

Gaffney put together perhaps its most complete game of the season, earning a fourth win in a row over Northwestern at District 3 Stadium on Friday, and turning away Trojans, 28-7.

The Indians, who lost 40-26 to South Pointe on the same field in Week 0, came back to Rock Hill on Friday night looking for redemption. Northwestern had revenge on its mind, having lost, 16-13, to Gaffney in the third round of last year’s playoffs.

Gaffney had the upper hand this time around.

“It wasn’t a secret that Gaffney’s a good team,” Northwestern coach Page Wofford said. “No matter what their record is, they’re still a good football team and good football program. We were just so uncharacteristic tonight. So many things went — not just the way that we didn’t expect, but so many kids played differently than what we expected them to play tonight. Things happened differently than we expected as a staff.”

After a defensive struggle in the first quarter, Gaffney broke into the scoring column with 6:32 to play in the half when Drew Medley hauled in a 30-yard toss from Grayson Loftis. Loftis later hit Emazon Littlejohn on a two-yard throw to put the Indians ahead, 14-0.

Northwestern (4-1) shook off its early offensive struggles on the final drive of the period, going 60 yards in four plays to halve the lead. Finley Polk connected with Ben Gregory on a 16-yard pass to cap the scoring drive.

The Trojans received the ball to start the second half, but all three of the Trojans’ third-quarter possessions ended prematurely, once each in a punt, a missed field goal, and a turnover on downs.

Gaffney (2-2) turned in a tremendous defensive effort, limiting a Trojan offense that entered the game averaging 60 points and 300 rushing yards per contest to just 212 yards of total offense. Northwestern rushed for just eight yards and tallied only 12 first downs — only one of which came on the ground. The Indians also maintained a 30:08 to 17:52 advantage in time of possession.

“Gaffney’s a pretty good defense,” Wofford said.

The Indians’ offense proved elusive, generating 427 yards while converting 11-of-16 times on third down. Gaffney also converted a fourth-down opportunity. The defensive performance left Wofford with many things for his side to correct during the upcoming bye week.

“We have to work on some tackling. I’ll make sure we do it,” Wofford said. “We had guys in positions to make plays. For whatever reason, tonight it just didn’t happen for us.”

Gaffney quarterback and Duke commit Grayson Loftis connected on 24-of-34 passes for 281 yards and two scores. Running backs Quashon Tate and Jaiden McDowell bolstered the offensive output, combining for 165 yards on 34 carries and having their way with the Northwestern defensive front. Defensively, the Indians snatched two errant Trojan passes to set themselves up for key drives.

The Trojans now get a bye week before starting Region 3-4A play with a home contest against Lancaster on Friday, Sept. 30.

“(Tonight) was me. It all falls on me. I take full responsibility for it,” Wofford said. “I’ve gotta do a better job with the offense and put them in better positions to be successful. I’ve gotta do a better job on the defense, working on tackling, coverages, and the things we need to get better on.”

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