Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in James Island, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word “open enrollment” sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there’s always a nagging feeling that you’re wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Care Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you’re in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in cityname or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you’re approaching the golden years of your life, it’s important you understand what Medicare is if you don’t already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor’s visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Care Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won’t cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called “PDPs,” these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Care Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in James Island

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in “gaps” that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Care Insurance Solutions sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Care Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you will be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agency that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Care Insurance Solutions has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in cityname is during the six-month Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Care Insurance Solutions today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in James Island, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Care Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called “MA Plans” or “Part C,” Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an “all in one” solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Care Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Care Insurance Solutions to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in cityname. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan’s service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan’s network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

The Senior Care Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in James Island

Friends and family of missing boater handing out life jackets to other boaters in his honor

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – As the search continues for a missing boater near Wadmalaw Island, his friends and family are working to keep other boaters safe in his honor.Logan Wood, 18, was duck-hunting on the Edisto River on January 13 when he went missing.Wood’s family and friends told News 2 that he loved fishing and hunting and spent much of his time on the water.Shortly after Wood went missing, a ...

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – As the search continues for a missing boater near Wadmalaw Island, his friends and family are working to keep other boaters safe in his honor.

Logan Wood, 18, was duck-hunting on the Edisto River on January 13 when he went missing.

Wood’s family and friends told News 2 that he loved fishing and hunting and spent much of his time on the water.

Shortly after Wood went missing, a GoFundMe was started to help his family with immediate expenses. As of Thursday, the fundraiser had already brought in over $25,000.

Wood’s family is now teaming up with West Marine in West Ashley to purchase discounted life vests to hand out to other boaters.

West Marine’s assistant manager, Sarah Horres, met Wood during his many visits to the store. She helped coordinate the partnership.

“He literally sat at the register with me for about an hour and we talked about his boat and everything. We became friends from there,” said Horres.

She said West Marine is contributing over 140 life jackets to the cause.

Wood’s family is planning to distribute the jackets at local boat landings, starting next week. They hope to prevent other situations like this from happening.

“If one person wears it, and we find them, then it did its job,” said Kim Ambrose.

Ambrose is a close family friend. She said Wood was the best fisherman she knew and said she was shocked to hear he never returned.

Moving forward, she said his family plans to use the money to host a fishing tournament in the spring. They also hope to start a scholarship for children at Camp Woodie, to encourage kids to go out and enjoy the outdoors just like Wood did.

Ambrose said West Marine is also offering discounted life vests to customers who mention Wood’s name at checkout.

If you would like to donate to the GoFundMe, click here. You can also make a donation at Pinnacle Bank on Johns Island.

Ambrose said Wood’s friends and family will not stop searching until he is back home.

Pandemic boosted pursuit for SC driver’s license tests toward private sector

Getting a driver’s license can be an exciting milestone or a loathsome task depending on the circumstances, but during the COVID-19 pandemic it became one more thing: a potential health threat.Sitting in a small, enclosed space with someone who is neither a close friend nor a family member is typically what getting a driver’s license requires. And that was a pandemic no-no. So for most of 2020 and 2021, South Carolina did not allow state examiners to ride with license applicants for driving tests.The result? More bu...

Getting a driver’s license can be an exciting milestone or a loathsome task depending on the circumstances, but during the COVID-19 pandemic it became one more thing: a potential health threat.

Sitting in a small, enclosed space with someone who is neither a close friend nor a family member is typically what getting a driver’s license requires. And that was a pandemic no-no. So for most of 2020 and 2021, South Carolina did not allow state examiners to ride with license applicants for driving tests.

The result? More business flowed to private driving schools, which in South Carolina are allowed to conduct tests and approve students for a driver’s license.

“It got us very busy,” said Anthony Fralix, an owner and instructor at James Island Driving School. “Since the DMV wasn’t doing testing, it sent a lot of business to us.”

The Department of Motor Vehicles didn’t actually stop testing, but the road tests required for a license were only offered at DMV offices that had on-site driving courses where officials could watch applicants drive through the series of tests from outside the vehicle.

“They were held to the same standards and we had policies in place to address that,” said Kyle McGahee, the DMV’s chief of strategic communications and community affairs. “It was just in a parking lot.”

Previously, license applicants who went to a state facility would be tested with a DMV examiner in the car, usually on public roads following planned routes.

When concerns about the virus prompted a change in policy — no DMV examiners in cars with applicants — license testing was limited to roughly half the DMV’s 66 locations that had “testing pads” with driving courses on site and by appointment only.

“We did have a lot of questions and some people said they were having trouble finding appointments near them,” said Cindy Hutto, the agency’s driver’s licenses standards manager. “Even though it was in half the number of sites, the staffing was moved and we were running road tests throughout the day.”

In-car testing at DMV offices was halted from May 2020 to June 1, 2021, then halted again from September to mid-November 2021 after the delta variant caused a surge in COVID cases nationwide. In-car testing has since resumed and appointments are no longer required.

At Rusty’s Driving School in Mount Pleasant, owner Rusty Hires said he briefly shut down his business in 2020 for only the third time in 35 years — the other two being Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and the 2018 winter storm that closed roads and Charleston International Airport.

After about a month, Hires reopened for business with COVID-19 restrictions in place.

“We reduced our class sizes and mandated masks,” Hires. said “Very few of our clients objected.”

Rusty’s Driving School continued to do in-car license testing, and Hires said they picked up lots of business.

“Even before the pandemic we had driver training schools that were testing drivers,” said Hutto. “From the kid’s perspective, they might be more comfortable testing with the people who trained them.”

Detailed statistics on the number of road tests conducted by private businesses were unavailable from the state, partly because of a change in the way they are reported. Regardless of who conducts the test, the DMV issues the license.

In the pandemic years of 2020 and 2021 the DMV issued, respectively, 39,467 and 38,933 regular (non-commercial) licenses that would have required driving tests. In 2019, the last full year before the pandemic, 36,514 were issued.

At least in the greater Charleston area, where population growth has been driven by people moving from other states, it’s not just teens seeking licenses.

“You’ve got a lot of people who moved here, like from New York, and had never learned to drive,” Fralix said. Those drivers, he said, are about half his clients.

Hires said a sizeable portion of the business is older residents who moved to the area.

“Some have a license and just want a little improvement, and some never drove because they could walk out their door and jump on a train or a bus,” he said.

The omicron variant has sent COVID-19 cases soaring once again, but this time the DMV has announced no restrictions on in-car driver’s license testing.

However, some offices are offering limited services due to staffing issues.

The South Carolina Football Hall of Fame reveal class of 2021 finalists

GREENVILLE, S.C. —In the fall of 2021, 76 nominees were chosen that have played collegiate football for an in-state institution or grew up in South Carolina and played out of state with excellence during their full career. The vote was determined by sports media, the SCFHOF Board of Advisors and Directors, supporting members and fans of the South Carolina Football Hall of Fame (SCFHOF). The SCFHOF is proud to announce the final ballot consisting of 26 modern-era and four Legacy finalists eligible for a five-pers...

GREENVILLE, S.C. —

In the fall of 2021, 76 nominees were chosen that have played collegiate football for an in-state institution or grew up in South Carolina and played out of state with excellence during their full career. The vote was determined by sports media, the SCFHOF Board of Advisors and Directors, supporting members and fans of the South Carolina Football Hall of Fame (SCFHOF). The SCFHOF is proud to announce the final ballot consisting of 26 modern-era and four Legacy finalists eligible for a five-person class to be enshrined at the 9th Annual Enshrinement & Benefit scheduled for March 31, 2022 at the Hilton Greenville.

The 26 modern day finalists have ties to in-state programs including the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, The Citadel, South Carolina State, Furman, Newberry, and Wofford. Nine of those finalists grew up in the state and played their college ball at an out-of-state program. The four Legacy finalists represent Clemson University, Western Carolina, South Carolina State University, and the University of South Carolina.

Class of 2021 Modern Era Finalists (Alphabetical Order):

1. Terry Allen(Commerce GA, Clemson ’86-’89, Minnesota Vikings ’91-’94 (9th Rnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’95-’98, New England Patriots ’99, New Orleans Saints ’00, Baltimore Ravens ’01, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘15)

2. Mike Ayers: (Georgetown KY, Georgetown (KY) '66-''69, Assist Coach: Georgetown, Newberry, Wofford, Richmond HC: ETSU '85-'87, Wofford'88-'17, 218-160-2 overall HC record, 5x SoCon Champion, 8-8 FCS Playoff record)

3. Jeff Bostic (Greensboro NC, Clemson ’76-‘79, Washington Redskins ’80-’93. 3x Super Bowl Champion, All Pro ’83, Pro Bowl ’83, Washington Redskins Ring of Fame, made 70 Greatest Redskins list, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘95)

4. Joe Bostic (Greensboro NC, Clemson ’75-’78, St. Louis/Phoenix Cardinals ’79-’88 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), 2x Clemson All-American, Older brother of Jeff Bostic, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘10)

5. Peter Boulware (Columbia, SC; Florida State ’93-’96, Baltimore Ravens ’97-’05 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Pro Bowl ’98, ’99, ’02, ’03, All-Pro ’99, NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year Award ’97, Super Bowl XXXV Champion, AFC Sacks Leader ‘01)

6. Troy Brown (Barnwell SC, Marshall ’89-’92, New England Patriots ’93-’07 (8th Rnd Draft Pick), 3x Super Bowl Champion, Pro Bowl ’01, New England Patriots Hall of Fame/50thAnniversary Team, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘16)

7. Dexter Coakley (Mt. Pleasant SC, Appalachian St. ’93-’96, Dallas Cowboys ’97-’04 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), St. Louis Rams ’05-’06, SoCon Freshman of the Year, 3x SoCon DPOY ’94-’96, 2x Buck Buchanan Award ’95, ’96, ’97 NFL All-Rookie team, 3x Pro Bowl ’99, ’01, ’03, College Football Hall of Fame ‘11, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘19)

8. Ben Coates (Greenwood SC, Livingstone College ’88-’91, New England Patriots ’91-’99 (5th Rnd Draft Pick), Baltimore Ravens ’00, 5x Pro Bowl ’94-’98, 3x All-Pro 1st Team ’94, ’95, 2nd Team ’98, Super Bowl Champion (XXXV), NFL 1990’s All-Decade Team, New England Patriots Hall of Fame ’08, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘15)

9. Woody Dantzler (Orangeburg SC, Clemson ’97-’01, Dallas Cowboys ’02, ’05, Atlanta Falcons ’02, First QB in NCAA history to pass for 2,000 yards and rush for 1,000 in same season, held 53 Clemson football records)

10. Brad Edwards (Lumberton NC, South Carolina ’84-’87, Minnesota Vikings ’88-’89 (2nd Rnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’90-’93, Atlanta Falcons ’94-’96, Super Bowl XXVI Champion, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’11, Athletic Director (AD): Newberry College, Jacksonville University Current: AD for George Mason University)

11. James “Jumpy” Geathers (Georgetown SC, Wichita St ’80-’83, New Orleans Saints ’84-’89 (2ndRnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’90-’92, Atlanta Falcons ’93-95, Denver Broncos ’96-’97, Super Bowl XXVI Champion)

12. John Gilliam (Greenwood SC, SC State ’63-66, New Orleans Saints ’67-’68 (2ndRnd Draft Pick), St. Louis Cardinals ’69-’71, Minnesota Vikings ’72-’74, ’75, Atlanta Falcons ’76, Chicago Bears ’77, New Orleans Saints ’77, 4 x Pro Bowl selection ’72-’75, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘92)

13. Dwayne Harper (Orangeburg SC, SC State ’84-’87, Seattle Seahawks ’88-’93 (11th Rnd Draft Pick), San Diego Chargers ’94-’98, Detroit Lions ’99, 24 career INTs, and 10 forced fumbles)

14. Stanford Jennings (Summerville SC, Furman’80-’83, Cincinnati Bengals ’84-’90 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), New Orleans Saints ’91, Tampa Bay Buccaneers ’92, 1981 SoCon Player of the Year, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘06)

15. Terry Kinard (Bitburg West Germany, Sumter HS, Clemson ’79-’82, New York Giants ’83-’89 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Houston Oilers ’90, Consensus All-American ’81, ’82, College Football Hall of Fame ’01, National Champion ’81, Pro Bowl ’88, Super Bowl Champion (XXI), Clemson all-time leader in interceptions (19), Clemson Ring of Honor ’01, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘02)

16. Marcus Lattimore (Duncan SC, South Carolina ’10-’12, San Francisco 49ers ’13-’14, USA Today HS All-American, NCAA Freshman of the Year ’10, Sporting News All-Freshman Team, 1st Team All-SEC ’10, 2ndTeam All-American, 2nd Team All-SEC ’11)

17. George Martin (Greenville SC, Oregon ’71-’74, New York Giants ’75-’88 (11thRnd Draft Pick), Super Bowl XXI Champion, scored 7 touchdowns (one lined up as a tight end) as a defensive lineman which is second to Jason Taylor in NFL history)

18. Stump Mitchell (Kingsland GA, The Citadel ’77-’80, St. Louis Cardinals ’81-’87 (9thRnd Draft Pick), Phoenix Cardinals ’88-’89, Kansas City Chiefs ’90 (player)/Head Coach: Morgan State ’96-’98, Southern ’10-‘12/Assistant: San Antonio Riders ’92, Morgan State ’95, Seattle Seahawks ’99-’07, Washington Redskins ’08-’09, Arizona Cardinals RB coach ’13- 17, New York Jets RB Coach 2017-2018, Cleveland Browns ’19 (current), South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘99)

19. Sidney Rice (Gaffney SC, South Carolina ’05-’06, Minnesota Vikings (2ndRnd Draft Pick) ’07-’10, Seattle Seahawks ’11-’13, Pro Bowl ’09, All-Pro ’09, Super Bowl XLVIII champion, NFL record for most touchdown receptions in a playoff game (3), U of SC Athletic Hall of Fame ’16, U of SC career TD reception record holder (23-tied))

20. Tony Rice (Greenwood SC, Notre Dame ’86-’89, Saskatchewan Roughriders ’90 (CFL), Barcelona Dragons ’91-’92 (World League), Munich Thunder ’94 (FLE), 1988 National Champion, ’89 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, ’89 4thin Heisman, ’89 All-American)

21. Brian Ruff (Mountainside NJ, Citadel ’69-’72, Baltimore Colts ’72 (11th Rnd Draft Pick), 3x All-SoCon ’74, ’75,’76, 2x SoCon Player of the Year ’75, ’76, SC Player of the Year ’75, ’76, 1st Team AP All-American ’72, Citadel retired his #51 jersey, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’06, All-time leading tackler in SoCon history (755))

22. Rick Sanford (Rock Hill SC, South Carolina ’76-’79, New England Patriots ’79-’84 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Seattle Seahawks ’85, NCAA All-American ’78, 1st UofSC player to be selected in 1stround of the NFL Draft, All-Pro ’83, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’98)

23. Connor Shaw (Flowery Branch GA, South Carolina ’10-13, Cleveland Browns ’14-’15 (undrafted), Chicago Bears ’16, 2014 Capital One Bowl MVP, went 17-0 as a starter at home, and 27-5 overall, was starting quarterback of 3 straight 11-win seasons. Current: USC Director of Football Relations)

24. Clyde Simmons Jr. (Lane SC, Western Carolina ’82-’85, Philadelphia Eagles ’86-’93 (9thRnd Draft Pick), Arizona Cardinals ’94-’95, Jacksonville ’96-’97, Cincinnati Bengals ’98, Chicago Bears ’99-’00, 100 sack Club, 2x Pro Bowl/All-Pro ’91, ’92, Philadelphia Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, (coaching)LA Rams Asst. Def. Line Coach ’12-current)

25. CJ Spiller (Lake Burton FL, Clemson'06-'09, Buffalo Bills '10-'14 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), NO Saints '15-'16, Seahawks, Jets, Chiefs-'16-'17, All-American, CFB Hall '20, Pro Bowl '12 /Current: Clemson RB Coach)

26. Roddy White (James Island SC, UAB ‘01-’04, Atlanta Falcons (1st Rnd Draft Pick) ‘05-’15, 4x Pro Bowl, 1x First-Team All Pro, 2010 NFL Receptions Leader, Atlanta Falcons Ring of Honor)

Legacy Finalists:

1. Chester McGlockton(1969-2011, Whiteville NC, Clemson’88-’91, LA/Oakland Raiders (1st Rnd Draft Pick) ’92-’97, Kansas City Chiefs ’98-’00, Denver Broncos ’01-’02, New York Jets ’03, 4 x Pro Bowl ’94-’97, 3 x All-Pro ’94-’96, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘11)

2. Joe Morrison(1937-1989, Lima OH, Cincinnati ’55-’58, New York Giants (3rd Rnd Draft Pick) ’59-’72, Head Coach: Chattanooga ’73-’79, New Mexico ’80-’82, South Carolina’83-’88, Walter Camp Coach of the Year ’84, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘89)

3. Marion Motley(1920-1999, Leesburg GA, SC State ’39, Nevada ’41-’43, Cleveland Browns ’46-’53, Pittsburgh Steelers ’55, NFL Champion ’50, Pro Bowl ’50, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, 4 x AAFC Champion ’46-’49, Pro Football Hall of Fame ’68)

4. David Patten (1974-2021, Hopkins SC, Western Carolina ’92-’95, New York Giants ’97-’99, Cleveland Browns ’00, ‘09, New England Patriots ’01-’04, ‘10, Washington Redskins ’05-’06, New Orleans Saints ’07-’08, 3x Super Bowl Champion (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX))

Letters: Johns Island development is leading to dangerous potholes, accidents

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designedThis has led to numerous dan...

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.

This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.

Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.

Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designed

This has led to numerous dangerous potholes and vehicle accidents.

There were 69 car fatalities in Charleston County in 2020, a number of which were on Johns Island.

A recent study conducted by Insurify Insights found that Johns Island has the most accident-prone drivers in the United States.

Due to the heavy traffic, it is difficult for emergency vehicles to get to their destination in a safe, timely manner.

Flooding has increased as trees are clear-cut from property and are replaced with asphalt, multiple apartment complexes and homes.

The last thing we need is 47 more acres of tree-filled land to be turned into more multifamily development.

A recent letter to the editor pointed out that the residents of Johns Island have been pleading to the city of Charleston and Charleston County to stop approving more development until we can get the infrastructure in place to support the existing residents.

Our pleas fall on deaf ears.

JEANNE WILLIAMS

Johns Island

Two letters published in the Dec. 12 Post and Courier expressed concerns about two unrelated subjects.

A Wadmalaw Island resident wrote about the relentless development of what was once pristine rural land around the tri-county area. I sympathized because the same song is being sung seemingly everywhere in the Lowcountry.

The second letter talked about the teacher shortage and how it is negatively affecting our quality of life.

That letter listed a number of suggestions to help alleviate the shortage. Several items involved needing more support and awareness from local and state politicians.

I rarely see any explanation or rebuttal to these letters from any of our legislators or council members. I would love to see them explain to the public in writing how they think relentless development is making our lives better.

And please don’t keep saying it’s for a bigger tax base.

Our teachers need increased support. They are an investment in our future and we should start taking note of that.

I encourage council members and legislators to respond to these issues.

Their collective silence to issues voiced by the public makes it seem like they don’t hear our complaints and concerns.

EDDIE COLLINS

Mount Pleasant

It seems that every time Charleston experiences a flood event, many point to climate change.

Land subsidence, another important component to sea level change, is rarely mentioned. Subsidence is largely a natural process, but it has a significant human component.

As development in the Lowcountry has exploded and demand on groundwater has increased, aquifers are not recharging fast enough to prevent land above from sinking.

Another problem is the loss of wetlands that result in more runoff, intensifying soil erosion.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sea level at Charleston Harbor has increased about 13 inches over the past century. But according to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the land around Charleston has sunk about 5 inches over the same period. As development increases, so does the sinking.

We could spend billions of dollars to fight climate change, but for Charleston, it won’t solve the problem.

JOSEPH LEONARD

Charleston

About two months ago, I sent letters of complaint to the headquarters of a large health care organization with a Lowcountry presence.

The letters were addressed to a corporate officer and at least one to the local CEO.

The letters contained documented violations of health care regulations and a potential breach of patient health care information security.

One of the things specifically asked for was an audit of my health care record looking for unauthorized access.

I waited for a reply, an acknowledgement or some action. Nothing.

In the past, such complaints were met with at least a form letter in response and in most cases, some positive action.

Apparently not here, not now in today’s business world.

It seems as if the corporation isn’t interested in what consumers have to say.

I’m a bit frustrated but I won’t be going away anytime soon. I gave the organization a chance to self-correct; perhaps when the complaints start coming from its regulators it might start listening.

I find it ironic that this particular organization talks about being responsive and responsible in its literature. Perhaps the leaders should reacquaint themselves with their own code of ethics.

TIMOTHY C. KIEL

Mount Pleasant

Town of James Island to request $6.4M in state, federal funds to stem creek contamination

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not b...

JAMES ISLAND (WCSC) – The Town of James Island will be requesting millions of dollars in state and federal grants to fund a project designed to make a local creek safer to swim.

Dave Schaeffer, the James Island Public Service District’s district manager, discussed the grants, which would allow over 200 properties near the creek to switch from septic tanks to water and sewer lines, during a meeting of the James Island Creek Task Force, Thursday afternoon.

“Right now, as what we’re seeking, there would not be out of pocket tap fees and connection fees, impact fees to the residents,” Schaeffer said.

The town said they will be requesting $6.4 million in federal and state funding to help make the project happen. In addition to the requested money, Schaeffer said the town will commit $1.8 million from American Rescue Plan funds that the town had received.

The James Island Creek Task Force consists of members from the City of Charleston, James Island and Charleston County.

Charleston Waterkeeper Executive Director Andrew Wunderley, who is part of the task force, said the group was formed in 2020 to find ways to clean up the creek and make it safe for swimming.

“Right now, we have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to get this right with the American Rescue Act funding that’s coming to the state of South Carolina and is specifically earmarked for projects like this that are tied to public health and are tied to water and sewer upgrades,” Wunderley said.

Fred Schuh has lived alongside the James Island Creek for 20 years. He said he uses the creek regularly with his grandchildren and wants the septic tanks in the area removed to better the community’s health.

“It is concerning,” Schuh said. “Except for people who take an interest in testing it, we would not know there’s anything changed about it, but when there’s scientific studies done to show that there’s a problem, we need to pay attention to it.”

As a possible solution, Schuh also suggested that septic tanks should be inspected more frequently, so property owners could know when to repair their tanks.

However, for now, he said he supports the town requesting the funds to help solve the problem.

“If we could make the public aware of this and ask whatever funds possible be diverted to this extremely useful endeavor, I say I’m all for it,” Schuh said.

Schaeffer said during the meeting that he hopes the project gets funded when the money from the federal government begins being distributed in January or February.

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