Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in James Island, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in James Island or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Medicare James Island, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance James Island, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in James Island

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans James Island, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in James Island is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in James Island, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans James Island, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance James Island, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in James Island. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare James Island, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance James Island, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage James Island, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in James Island, SC

Live updates: SCHSL boys and girls soccer state championships at Irmo High School

IRMO — The SCHSL state soccer championships have begun at Irmo High School just north of downtown Columbia.Friday was packed full of excitement -- Powdersville's girls, Daniel's boys and both teams from Eastside all competed for state championships.Here is the live updates, roundup and recap of the ...

IRMO — The SCHSL state soccer championships have begun at Irmo High School just north of downtown Columbia.

Friday was packed full of excitement -- Powdersville's girls, Daniel's boys and both teams from Eastside all competed for state championships.

Here is the live updates, roundup and recap of the SCHSL state soccer championships in Columbia:

4A boys: Eastside boys beats North Augusta

The time had finally come for the Eagles.

After a scoreless first half from both teams, Eastside senior Jack Redmond scored the game-winner with just under 35 minutes left in the match. Then Eastside had to play a man down for much of the second half after one of their players was assessed a second yellow card.

It is the Eagle's first state championship since 2014.

4A girls: Eastside falls to James Island

The Eagles trailed 2-0 at the half against James Island. Both goals were scored by James Island sophomore Alexis Spivey.

James Island dominated again in the second half and defeated Eastside 5-0 to win the state title. The Trojans were led by Spivey, who's two early goals in the first half set the tone for a dominant performance.

The Trojans have now won back-to-back state championships in AAAA.

3A boys: Daniel prevails in PKs

Daniel prevailed in a penalty shootout over Brookland-Cayce for the Class AAA title. Daniel won the match after it started nearly four hours previously and was delayed due to weather.

It is the Lions' first state championship in boys soccer since 2003.

After Daniel stormed to a 2-0 lead against Brookland-Cayce on Friday afternoon, things turned. The Lions fell behind in regulation, 3-2, after giving up three straight goals in the second half.

Lions' senior Liam Desjardins scored from nearly half field on a free kick to tie the game with just under two minutes left in regulation and send it to overtime. Daniel finished its season with a 22-5 overall record. The Lions now have won five boys' soccer state titles.

3A girls: Powdersville loses to Oceanside Collegiate

Powdersville lost 4-0 to Oceanside Collegiate, ending the season with a 19-1 overall record.

"We came in at the beginning of the season and (state) was our goal," coach Colin Melton said postgame. "We said, 'hey, let's win region and then let's get to state,' and we fell short of that last goal of winning state. But they gave it 100 percent and I couldn't be more proud of them."

Check back for updates. Joe Dandron and Joshua Miller cover high school athletics for The Anderson Independent-Mail and The Greenville News.

NBC’s ‘Today’ giving world a glimpse of Hilton Head. 10 things to know about Friday’s show

Coastal South Carolina — from its cuisine to its wild critters to its home-grown celebrities — will be shared with the world Friday when the New York City-based “Today” show broadcasts from the beaches of Hilton Head Island.Viewers will get a taste of what makes Lowcountry living so special, said Charlie Clark, vice president of communications of the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce, which is assisting NBC — fr...

Coastal South Carolina — from its cuisine to its wild critters to its home-grown celebrities — will be shared with the world Friday when the New York City-based “Today” show broadcasts from the beaches of Hilton Head Island.

Viewers will get a taste of what makes Lowcountry living so special, said Charlie Clark, vice president of communications of the Hilton Head Island-Bluffton Chamber of Commerce, which is assisting NBC — from the great cuisine to a dedication to environmental preservation, and more.

“It’s phenomenal coverage for the destination,” Clark said, “and gives the world a glimpse of so many of the great aspects of Hilton Head Island and those who call it home.”

Here’s 10 details about Friday morning’s showcase of Hilton Head:

The “3rd Hour” of the program will be broadcast live from Hilton Head and will air at 9 a.m. ET on NBC affiliate WSAV Channel 3. You can’t watch in person because the audience already has been chosen and registration is closed.

At a Vrbo luxury two-story beachfront vacation house at Sea Pines Resort featuring a private pool, panoramic views of the ocean, multiple decks and outdoor seating. The exact location has not been provided. Sea Pines spans the southern third of the Palmetto State’s Hilton Head Island.

Yes. It took just a little over an hour for the available audience spots to fill up after an invitation was made public Tuesday morning, said Elizabeth Bader of NBCUniversal. NBC did not release the number of people who were chosen to be in the live audience. Trolleys will transport those who registered in time from Coligny into Sea Pines, a gated community.

Al Roker, the anchor and weatherman who’s been a mainstay with the “Today” show for more than 40 years, will be joined by fellow hosts Craig Melvin, who’s from Columbia, and Sheinelle Jones and Dylan Dreyer, who make up Today’s “3rd Hour” team.

The show’s home base is Rockefeller Center in New York City, 843 miles north of Hilton Head, where tourists on the plaza wave signs hoping to get on TV.

Roker told WSAV Coastal Sunrise anchors Kim Gusby and Ben Katko on Wednesday that it was the 3rd Hour group’s first major trip since the start of the pandemic in early 2020.

“Oh, I’ve got to tell you,” Roker told WSAV, “we are so excited.”

To get families excited to travel this summer, “Today” and Vrbo, the show’s sponsor, decided to broadcast live from a popular beach destination, said Alison Kwong, a Vrbo spokesperson, and Hilton Head “made perfect sense” for a couple of reasons.

First, summer demand for Vrbo vacation homes on the island, Kwong said, has increased 40% compared with pre-pandemic times. Second, Hilton head is one of the favorite places of co-anchor Craig Melvin, a Columbia native, to visit with his family.

Viewers will see a tour of that oceanfront Vrbo rental, Roker told WSAV.

During the program, viewers will be treated to the story of the Atlantic loggerhead sea turtle, which returns each year to Hilton Head to lay her eggs, in addition to the efforts of local people to preserve their beach habitat, such as Amber Kuehn, director of Sea Turtle Patrol Hilton Head.

“The most important part of being a part of this show,” Kuehn told the Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette, “is to benefit the turtles.”

Last Friday, at 5:30 a.m., in the rain, an NBC crew, including anchor and meteorologist Dreyer, joined Kuehn and turtle patrol members in scouring the beach looking for turtle tracks and nests. From May through October, these volunteers search for nesting and hatching activity. With their back flippers, the big turtles dig deep holes where they lay up to 120 eggs.

“They were as excited as we were,” Kuehn said of the reaction of NBC crew members when nest No. 5 was discovered.

During a lull in the rain, Dreyer interviewed Kuehn, who was able to share her familiar message about the endangered sea turtle’s survival and conservation. That includes the importance of filling holes, which turtles can fall into, and limiting bright lights, which can confuse hatchlings and draw them away from the ocean illuminated by the moonlight and stars.

“It’s about getting the message out to a larger audience,” said Kuehn, who called the NBC crew members “normal, down-to-earth people.”

Chef Orchid Paulmeier, owner of One Hot Mama’s American Grill, and Andrew Carmines of Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks, also will be featured during the 3rd Hour.

Charleston native Lenard Larry McKelvey, known professionally as Charlamagne tha God, co-host of the nationally syndicated radio show The Breakfast Club, is another special guest.

Not really. Residents would be surprised, the Chamber of Commerce’s Clark said, at just how much national media coverage Hilton Head Island receives each year.

In the past, the chamber has assisted productions of the Food Network, HGTV, and “The Bachelorette.” The chamber works with the shows, Clark said, to capture the island’s iconic features and hidden gems.

This story was originally published May 19, 2022 2:36 PM.

Thursday headlines: Breakaway churches ordered by high court to return property to national Episcopalians

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its ...

Nearly a decade ago, more than two dozen parishes broke away from the national Episcopal Church. But on Wednesday after years of legal wrangling, the South Carolina Supreme Court ordered 14 of the 29 parishes that broke away must return its property to the Episcopal Church and its affiliated South Carolina diocese. The court also ordered turnover of Camp St. Christopher on Seabrook Island to the national church, which is represented by 29 parishes from Charleston to Columbia.

Among the breakaway churches in what is called the Anglican Diocese of South Carolina that will have to hand over their property include congregations in Charleston (Good Shepherd, Old St. Andrew’s, Holy Trinity) and Sumter, Walterboro, Hilton Head Island, Stateburg, Mount Pleasant (Christ Church) and James Island. Those not affected by the ruling include historic St. Phillip’s and St. Michael’s in downtown Charleston as well as churches in Bluffton, Beaufort, Conway, Summerville and Orangeburg.

In other recent headlines:

S.C. court halts execution by firing squad. The state Supreme Court issued a temporary stay on Wednesday, delaying its first-ever execution by firing squad due to a litigation in another court challenging the constitutionality of South Carolina’s execution methods.

S.C. Senate unanimously supports early voting. The South Carolina senate is showing unanimous, bipartisan support for an early voting bill that unanimously passed in the S.C. House in March. But in doing so, added that senators have the power to confirm the governor’s choices for the director and the five members of the board of the South Carolina Election Commission. The House is unlikely to approve the changes.

S.C. bill to curb abortions advances. The bill will give women 18 and older more access to birth control or other hormonal contraceptives by going directly to a pharmacist without a doctor’s prescription.

Proposal to bring new life to old West Ashley grocery store lot. The West Ashley Revitalization Commission heard a proposal on Monday of turning the old Piggly Wiggly property on Sam Rittenberg Blvd. into a community hub, consisting of small businesses, a restaurant with rooftop dining and city offices to the property.

Charleston residents want to limit student-style housing in neighborhoods. Charleston-area residents, mainly those who live in the downtown peninsula, attended a city planning commission meeting to join talks of developers building student-style housing from Radcliffe Street to Market Street. The City of Charleston proposed an overlay zone requiring more requirements for developers to purchase land and build housing.

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

Mosquito Beach hotel renovation project to forge ahead after ‘suspicious’ fire

MOSQUITO BEACH — As the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office investigates what it calls a suspicious fire at the construction site of the historic Pine Tree Hotel, project leaders are assessing the scope of the loss and vowing to forge ahead with plans to remake the building.“The damage is done,” project manager Kyle Taylor said. “We want to move forward with getting this thing done.”The project, years in the making, got a big boost several years ago when the National Park Service awarded a $43...

MOSQUITO BEACH — As the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office investigates what it calls a suspicious fire at the construction site of the historic Pine Tree Hotel, project leaders are assessing the scope of the loss and vowing to forge ahead with plans to remake the building.

“The damage is done,” project manager Kyle Taylor said. “We want to move forward with getting this thing done.”

The project, years in the making, got a big boost several years ago when the National Park Service awarded a $43,000 research grant to the nonprofit in charge, followed by $490,000 from the Park Service’s African American Civil Rights Grant Program to rehabilitate the Pine Tree Hotel.

Salvage work was nearing completion when the fire broke out at the rear of the structure on April 15, charring 28 old floor joists that contractors had hoped to reuse.

The damage was limited. About three-quarters of reusable materials already had been removed, Taylor said.

Replacing the lost joists likely will require a special arrangement and could cost more than $8,000, he said. That’s a blow, given the tight budget of about $500,000. And now the team wants to install security cameras that function 24/7, better lighting and a sprinkler system — all extra costs.

Last week, Charleston County approved an elevation variance, enabling the team to reconcile the Pine Tree Hotel historic designation (it’s included on the National Register of Historic Places) with the need to protect the building from potential flooding.

But they will need to make some other changes, including improved water drainage, the use of more gravel at the site and the installation of an air purification system inside the building.

Taylor said a new grant application has been submitted, and the team is hopeful it can secure about $450,000, helping them meet these new goals.

But he doesn’t want to put all his eggs in one basket, so he plans to start a GoFundMe campaign and possibly reach out to local grant-making organizations, he said.

The Sheriff’s Office released its incident report on the blaze April 18 but revealed little new information.

A deputy was dispatched at 3:29 p.m. April 15 and learned from firefighters at the scene of “suspicious circumstances,” according to the report.

Footprints were discovered around the structure, and two witnesses were identified.

Bill “Cubby” Wilder, a leader of the Sol Legare community of which Mosquito Beach is a part, said local witnesses spoke of a pickup truck driving off at the time of the fire.

Wilder said he would like to make Mosquito Beach Road private and close a gate after dark on days when the hotel and restaurants are not being used.

“It’s open to the public and we have no control,” he said. “I don’t mind people coming down there, but not after dark.”

Sol Legare Island once was part of Savannah Plantation, about 800 acres owned by Solomon Legare where enslaved laborers cultivated sea island cotton. After the Civil War, many African Americans operated small farms on adjacent James Island and on Sol Legare Island, which has remained predominantly Black to this day.

In 2018, someone stole a colorfully painted surf board welcoming people to Mosquito Beach, he said. In early 2019, a couple of White men drove a vehicle decorated with a big Confederate flag along the road, spray-painted the n-word and a swastika onto the pavement, then took off. County officials soon arrived to covered up the offensive graffiti.

Then in early 2021, someone stole a historic marker mounted at the end of Mosquito Beach Road; two weeks later a second marker near the entrance was knocked off its post. Wilder found car tracks close by, he said. He took the damaged sign to his home for safekeeping.

During the period of legal segregation in the South, Mosquito Beach was one of just a few places by the water where African Americans could congregate without fear of harassment or arrest.

It became a hot spot of social activity that reached a peak in the 1950s and ’60s. The small hotel filled up during warmer weather, and restaurants served traditional Lowcountry food. A boardwalk and pavilion over the marsh served as a stage for live music performances and dancing.

The popularity of Mosquito Beach waned as the Jim Crow era faded into the past, and in 1989 Hurricane Hugo clobbered the structures there. Local residents have been trying to revitalize this gathering place ever since, but the efforts have faltered for a lack of adequate funding and an abundance of bureaucratic obstacles.

But now things are progressing. The project’s funding included a Hurricane Irma Emergency Supplemental Historic Preservation Grant of $250,000 to restore the Island Breeze Restaurant next to the hotel.

Another restaurant nearby likely will reopen soon.

Wilder said the hotel renovation team expects to receive a building permit in the next few weeks, and to start work in May. By autumn, the new Pine Tree Hotel should be completed.

The investigation into the fire is still ongoing.

James Island community seeks Charleston County Historical Designation

Residents of Beefield on James Island want their community placed on the Charleston County Historic District.JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Beefield community on James Island is small, but the people make up a tight-knit and passionate neighborhood with a lot of stories.Community president George Richardson says between the military events, a sense of community and peaceful nature, it’s more important than ever to preserve Beefield’s history. To that end, he and his neighbors came out to a county meeting Tuesday ni...

Residents of Beefield on James Island want their community placed on the Charleston County Historic District.

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - The Beefield community on James Island is small, but the people make up a tight-knit and passionate neighborhood with a lot of stories.

Community president George Richardson says between the military events, a sense of community and peaceful nature, it’s more important than ever to preserve Beefield’s history. To that end, he and his neighbors came out to a county meeting Tuesday night to make their voice heard.

“Because when you start walking the dirt road, we’re all in the woods or the trees. It’s almost like you’re in another world. And just beyond that, the Folly Road we’re all in traffic running up and down Folly Beach, you forget all about that is like stepping into another time is peaceful. And that’s what my community loves,” Richardson says.

The “Bee Tract” is almost 60 acres of land on James Island off Folly Road at Battery Island Drive. Richardson says it is the site of important Civil War history including the 1862 Battle of Secessionville and an 1864 third Assault on James Island.

It is also part of an African American remnant freedman community.

“You drive down battery Island drive, which is along the stream, you’ll notice that every house has at least two oak trees in the front yard, and they’re draped in one straight line from one end to the other end,” he says. “You know, and we like that. We sit on our porch and we yell over to each other and that kind of thing.”

The South Carolina Battleground Preservation Trust says the archeological significance from battles is there and has been well preserved so far. Most of the land has been passed down to family members since they bought it in 1872.

Justin Schwebler, property manager for the Historic Charleston Foundation, says the status is an extra layer of protection and recognition for the people and their land.

“Basically, what that does is creating a process properties boundary around these original parcels of the historic district gives them an extra layer of protection against inappropriate development, things like that. So if anybody wants to come into the community change uses build a highway or something or build a hotel or restaurants,” Schwebler says.

The planning and public works committee will have a meeting about the Beefield land on April 21 and a proposal will come back for Charleston County Council to consider on April 26.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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