Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in Hilton Head, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in Hilton Head or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Medicare Hilton Head, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Hilton Head, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Hilton Head

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans Hilton Head, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Hilton Head is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in Hilton Head, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans Hilton Head, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance Hilton Head, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in Hilton Head. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare Hilton Head, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance Hilton Head, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage Hilton Head, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in Hilton Head, SC

Hundreds gathered at Hilton Head beach Saturday for annual lantern parade. Check it out

Lowcountry critters of all shapes and sizes lit up a single-mile stretch of beach just after sunset Saturday on Hilton Head for the annual lantern parade.Long before the sun had even set, the beach was crowded with hundreds of people either heading toward Alder Lane to line up for the parade or setting up chairs...

Lowcountry critters of all shapes and sizes lit up a single-mile stretch of beach just after sunset Saturday on Hilton Head for the annual lantern parade.

Long before the sun had even set, the beach was crowded with hundreds of people either heading toward Alder Lane to line up for the parade or setting up chairs in the sand to wait for marchers and their lanterns to go by. The event, which caps Crescendo Hilton Head’s arts and cultural events for October and November, began in 2019 as a way to celebrate the history and ecology on Hilton Head. This year, lanterns of a stingray, a shark, egrets, an alligator and, of course, plenty of sea turtles could be seen marching down the beach.

Among those attracted to the annual parade this year was 11-year-old Ella Meadows, who had her lantern idea, a dragon, cooking in her brain since attending the event last year. Ella took inspiration from online photos of how to construct her dragon but took creative liberties when it came to the dragon’s tail and wings. The battery packs, she said, were the heaviest part.

“The marching was long, and tiring,” she admitted.

Susan McCarthy, who came all the way from California, helped her friend, carpenter Jim Majewski, build a Blue Fine Tuna out of rice paper for the parade.

“It took a day to make and two days planning,” Majewski said. “So, five hours to make, but we had dinner in between.”

The two, along with Majewski’s wife, Bonnie, and a group of friends, had gotten to the beach early to scope out a good spot. Staked in the sand was a small post holding up the tuna to make it look like it was hanging off a fishing rod. Majewski has been attending the parade on Hilton Head since it began, but this was his first year making something to participate in the festivities. When deciding what he should make, Majewski said he took inspiration from years of fishing locally on Hilton Head.

“It came together,” he said. “I hadn’t used this, rice paper, I think, since I was a kid in the 70s and I would do mod podge with my parents.”

As the celebrations came to a close, drones buzzed overhead and the troupe from Full Spectrum Studio on Hilton Head began to pack up their snacks and lanterns. The studio, dreamed up by Andrea Hattler Bramson and Judy Russell, is Hilton Head’s first studio dedicated to artists with disabilities. Saturday at the parade, the studio’s volunteers had several artists with them, including Allison Good and Victoria Bramson, to cheer on their lanterns which were featured in the parade.

“This group changed my life,” said Good. “I met all of them [at the Hilton Head Farmer’s Market] and they said come on down to the studio. I got hooked.”

“She can’t get rid of us now,” Hattler Bramson joked.

The purpose of the studio, and events like the lantern parade, said studio volunteer Ann Walsh, is to give an opportunity to adults with disabilities to be creative and express themselves artistically.

“Allison is the exact person we want to find us,” she said. “We are the lucky ones.”

From Myrtle Beach to Hilton Head, expect coastal erosion possible from Nicole

Another storm means more worry.Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant...

Another storm means more worry.

Coastal South Carolina is bracing for another round of erosion, just over a month after surge from Hurricane Ian damaged dunes and washed away sand from several beaches along the Atlantic Ocean.

Large breaking waves up to 6 feet from Tropical Storm Nicole — which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane and is expected to weaken to a tropical depression before its core passes over South Carolina — are expected for parts of the coast until early Nov. 12. The rush could lead to significant erosion on beaches that aren’t equipped to handle much more.

Ann Wilson has worked as a park ranger for Myrtle Beach State Park since 1994. She said Ian’s dune destruction was the worst she has seen, even worse than Hurricane Matthew, which hit as a reduced Category 1 in 2016.

“If we had an Ian right now, everybody’s in trouble,” Wilson said.

She likened the protective role of sand dunes in storms to the role of offensive linemen protecting the quarterback in a football game.

“Sand dunes are our first line of defense against storms, wind and waves,” Wilson said. “The sand dunes did their job during Ian. It was a really rough game, and a lot of our players went out on injured reserve. If we had a Super Bowl tomorrow, we’re barely going to show up.”

After Hurricane Hugo decimated the dunes in 1989, regrowth efforts took place along the coastline. But Ian destroyed 20 to 30 feet of sand dunes off the park’s shoreline, which equate to decades’ worth of regrowth.

Because Nicole is not expected to hit the coast as directly or as forcefully as Ian, Wilson said she does not anticipate many issues related to flooding beyond areas where flooding typically occurs during storms, like in Garden City or Cherry Grove in North Myrtle Beach.

“The dunes will rebuild, but it’s not up to us on a timeframe,” Wilson said.

The U.S. Geological Survey said 55 percent of South Carolina’s dunes are forecast to face some level or erosion and about one percent could become inundated.

Pawleys Island, bordered to the west by Pawleys Creek and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, saw several feet of storm surge brought on by Ian that washed sand and debris into the roads and collapsed the Georgetown County town’s pier.

Nicole’s march toward the Upstate on its way to the mid-Atlantic region and beyond brought street-level flooding during high tide the morning of Nov. 10, with similar flooding seen on the Charleston peninsula.

Subsequent high tides on Pawleys Island should be less severe, said Town Administrator Daniel Newquist.

“I think it’s what we anticipated,” Newquist said. “We anticipated, during the high tide period, water coming over the creek bank and into the roadways.”

Newquist said he planned to inspect the town’s beaches during the afternoon low tide. In an email to island property owners, he said the town is “certainly” concerned about the potential for beach erosion so soon after Ian.

Of beach damage from Ian, Newquist said “fairly significant” erosion occurred and that beach renourishment undertaken in previous years was vital in protecting seaside properties. The Army Corps of Engineers began surveying the sands of Pawleys Island days after Ian’s landfall.

“We’re going to leverage whatever resources are available to us to get the beach back in good shape, but we did get a decent start, I think, with the dune repair work that’s been done with our contractor,” Newquist said.

Folly Beach also lost a good bit of sand during Ian. And the city had already hit its renourishment triggers prior to the storm, said Eric Lutz, the city’s director of building, facilities and public works.

But Lutz said the Charleston County beach should be OK during Nicole.

“There will just be less of it to sit on at each high tide,” he said in an email.

Flooding from Ian was mostly under elevated houses on the east end of the island and the marsh side.

The city also expected flooding on the back of the island from Nicole. To prep, staff was checking storm drains and putting barricades and cones in place for possible road closures.

Nicole Elko, president of Elko Coastal Consulting, said Folly Beach has little to no capacity to withstand additional erosion from another storm. She is working as a coastal consultant for the city.

“Fortunately, the dune system is robust along most of the island, and that will help protect the upland infrastructure,” Elko said.

The city is in the process of requesting federal emergency rehabilitation assistance, partly because of the lack of storm protection and flood mitigation in place to buffer from another hurricane, Elko said.

Other beaches in the Lowcountry also noted damage to dunes and loss of sand during Ian, but they weren’t particularly worried this time around.

“We’re not really doing anything to prevent that situation other than warning residents to be careful if they go in the ocean,” said Andy Benke, Sullivan’s Island town administrator.

Officials in Kiawah Island and Edisto Beach said they did not see measurable impacts from Ian.

Although coastal erosion wasn’t a big issue on Hilton Head Island either, the town started preparing for Nicole this week by removing beach mats, wooden trash bins and umbrella boxes up to the dune lines in beach areas.

Town officials reported high tide coupled with storm surge on Nov. 10 brought “considerable flooding” along some roads and island beaches. Along with flooding, officials warned residents about beach erosion, rough surf and dangerous rip currents.

Nicole Ziege contributed from Myrtle Beach and Mike Woodel from Georgetown County.

Hurricane Wire is a pop-up newsletter during hurricane season that delivers anyone who lives on the East Coast all the information they need to know as storms brew in the Atlantic and beyond.

Why South Carolina WR Josh Vann is still smiling, optimistic amid down final year

Josh Vann smirked as he positioned himself behind the lectern at the front of South Carolina’s defensive meeting room.“Man, y’all caught me on a bad day,” he joked with reporters Tuesday. “I need a haircut.”The room laughed. As did Vann, the Gamecocks’ leading pass-catcher a year ago.In a college football ecosystem filled with clichés and “coach speak,” Vann is refreshingly himself. He jokes during interviews, flashing the personality that makes him so beloved ...

Josh Vann smirked as he positioned himself behind the lectern at the front of South Carolina’s defensive meeting room.

“Man, y’all caught me on a bad day,” he joked with reporters Tuesday. “I need a haircut.”

The room laughed. As did Vann, the Gamecocks’ leading pass-catcher a year ago.

In a college football ecosystem filled with clichés and “coach speak,” Vann is refreshingly himself. He jokes during interviews, flashing the personality that makes him so beloved among teammates. He glows when talking about his daughter, Jennah, who was born last year and who’s been an added responsibility outside of football this year.

Vann is also introspective, expounding honestly on his 2022 on-field numbers not living up to preseason billing and why, despite that, he remains upbeat.

“It’s really been a one-of-a-kind year,” he said. “Coming back, I was thinking I was gonna have all the accolades, 1,000 yards receiving, like 50 catches — and it hasn’t been like that. But I’ve really just been taking everything day by day, cherishing these games, these practices with my brothers, these coaches.”

Vann’s time at South Carolina has twisted more than a Tilt-a-Whirl amusement ride. A four-star recruit out of the Atlanta area, he spurned Georgia for USC. The hype that came with his recruiting stock never quite materialized during his first three years, with 47 catches for 377 yards and two touchdowns over that span.

But 2021 was a glimpse at the talent always believed to be there.

Vann nearly doubled his output from the previous three years combined in Shane Beamer’s first fall as head coach. He finished the year leading the Gamecocks in receptions (43) and yards receiving (679). His five touchdown receptions also tied for tops on the team.

He weighed his NFL options after the 2021 campaign, sitting down with Beamer to discuss the decision. Vann decided it was in his best interest to come back for another year — albeit with a caveat.

“I can remember sitting in the office with him and telling him, ‘Look, if you’re coming back thinking that you’re going to catch 100 balls next season, you’re probably not,’ ” Beamer recounted. “Because I knew we had some other receivers coming along, we would have more depth on offense and it would’ve been hard for anybody, not just Josh.

“I also told him, ‘You can continue to help yourself for the next level.’ There’s certainly things that he could do better — not so much stats and accolades — but being able to show things at the receiver position.”

That Vann returned, prolific 2021 in tow, hasn’t exactly amounted to major contributions in the stat column. He’s sixth on the team in yards receiving (162) and eighth in receptions (14).

Still, there are developments worth circling.

Vann become an increasingly valuable tool in the punt return game, his return average jumping five yards from a season ago. Pro Football Focus also rates 2022 his second-best season on record, according to its 100-point grading scale.

Beamer, too, pointed to a handful of the key catches Vann has made this fall, limited as they’ve been. His 18-yard catch early in last week’s loss to Florida picked up a crucial third down. He added a highlight-reel grab in the win over Vanderbilt the week prior.

Defensive lineman Zacch Pickens noted Vann hasn’t stopped working in lieu of his limited targets. Vann and receiver Ahmarean Brown spend time after every practice running extra routes, catching balls and, per Pickens, “playing games.”

“He’s always gonna have a smile on his face,” Pickens said. “He’s going to do whatever he can for the team. If he’s not getting the ball, he’s trying to return a punt. ... Josh has matured a lot.”

Added running back Juju McDowell: “It’s been life-altering for me (watching Vann). I know Josh a lot more than other people know Josh. I know Josh as a human being. I know Josh as a father. And for him to come into an environment where we all projected Josh not to be in, to take a completely different trajectory and make the best out of it ... there’s not too many people that have the mental stability to do that, let alone the physical ability.”

Saturday, Vann will take the field at Williams-Brice Stadium one last time. The hope is he’s shown enough intangibly to latch onto an NFL roster when the time comes. Given what he’s done as a punt returner and on special teams, he should find himself in a pro training camp in 2023.

The 2022 season hasn’t gone according to plan. The 100 catches. The accolades. Those aren’t there.

Vann is still smiling through it all.

Hilton Head OKs affordable housing plan, formalizing shift that began at Chimney Cove

Applause filled the Hilton Head Town Council chambers Tuesday evening as faith leaders, nonprofit organizers and residents celebrated a new plan from the town to tackle affordable housing.The jubilation stands in stark contrast to the solemn atmosphere in the same room on Sept. 6, when town council called a special meeting to address August eviction notices at Chimney Cove that gave some residents less than 30 days to vacate. Th...

Applause filled the Hilton Head Town Council chambers Tuesday evening as faith leaders, nonprofit organizers and residents celebrated a new plan from the town to tackle affordable housing.

The jubilation stands in stark contrast to the solemn atmosphere in the same room on Sept. 6, when town council called a special meeting to address August eviction notices at Chimney Cove that gave some residents less than 30 days to vacate. The evictions were later rescinded, but would have forced around 300 people out of one of Hilton Head’s few affordable housing options.

That crisis, and the looming threat that Chimney Cove’s closure may only have been delayed, helped kick-start the effort to craft the newly adopted workforce housing framework, a four-pillar strategy introduced last Tuesday in a town council workshop.

The four pillars will be carried out simultaneously and involve the following steps: hiring town staff dedicated to affordable and workforce housing; educating the public on the need for housing; and creating a plan to identify and preserve the island’s existing affordable housing.

The primary unknown in the Oct. 26 presentation was the fourth pillar — revenue. That was partially addressed by town council Tuesday with a resolution to call on the state legislative delegates to allow for the use of accommodations and hospitality tax funds for workforce housing.

Residents at the meeting expressed initial concern that opening the door to using those funds on housing would create competition with other nonprofits on the island that rely on them.

Martin Lesch, a resident who addressed council, cautioned the broad implications affecting “thousands of jobs” tied to organizations reliant on accommodations and hospitality tax funding.

Ward 2 Councilman Bill Harkins, however, said the action was meant only to give the town a future option, should it be needed, to fund housing efforts. The accommodations and hospitality tax revenue streams will not serve as the primary source for housing funds.

“We’re not robbing Peter to pay Paul,” Harkins said. “It is an option, but you don’t want to do anything to degrade an asset that you have here in the community, like the symphony, like the performing arts activities. That would be regressive management, in my opinion.”

In the same agenda item, the town has asked state delegates to increase the annual appropriation of state housing tax credits to $40 million. It’s currently capped at $20 million.

Hilton Head also pledged its first-year contribution to the regional housing trust fund through an agenda item. The town will allocate $156,815 toward the trust, which municipalities across Beaufort and Jasper counties can use to fund affordable housing projects.

Town Manager Marc Orlando has been charged with identifying $1 million in recurring funds in the current fiscal year budget to fund the town’s new housing framework into the future. Following the meeting, Orlando didn’t immediately confirm which parts of the budget might present options to reallocate funds, but said he “had an idea.”

“Let me sleep on it,” he quipped.

In future town council agendas, Ward 1 Councilman Alex Brown suggested a part of the town manager’s report include updates on affordable housing to keep the effort front-of-mind for a soon-to-be revamped town council, which will have at least three new members and up to four, if Ward 4 incumbent Tamara Becker is not reelected.

“I like (Brown’s) suggestion to keep it up on the agenda,” said the Rev. June Wilkins, who leads the congregation at Christ Lutheran Church, next door to Chimney Cove. “We have to keep this in front of people. It’s not over yet ... We haven’t heard anything official (about Chimney Cove’s closure) but we know that this is always a possibility.”

Other notable agenda items included the approval of the Mid-Island Tract and Mid-Island district projects.

The Mid-Island Tract redevelopment plan is headlined by a 102-acre park area, which conceptual documents show may support open-air markets, relocation of the St. James Church, an eco-park area and more.

Ward 6 Councilman Glenn Stanford assured residents the agenda item’s passage didn’t indicate any construction would begin soon, only that the town was approving of concepts presented thus far. The entirety of the project is broken up into phases that would be completed over several years. The base cost for currently proposed phases is around $56.5 million.

The Mid-Island District project is a redevelopment plan encapsulating the Mid-Island tract area and surrounding communities, including many of the island’s Historic Gullah communities.

The project’s primary focuses include creating a consistent land-use map for the area and increasing density in the area to 6 to 8 dwelling units per acre, according to the agenda packet. The plan also looks to incorporate mixed-use zoning in the area, allowing for residential and commercial uses in close proximity.

This story was originally published November 1, 2022 7:21 PM.

Public meeting held to discuss affordable housing in Hilton Head

HILTON HEAD, S.C. (WTOC) - Affordable housing has been a problem on Hilton Head for years, but a recent threat you may remember is now sparking change.As hundreds of people’s leases were nearly terminated, town leaders say they realized action needed to be taken immediately to address the issue.In response to the panic caused at Chimney Cove, Hilton Head’s mayor asked town staff to begin work on an affordable housing framework.After weeks of effort, that framework was presented at a public meeting Tuesday wit...

HILTON HEAD, S.C. (WTOC) - Affordable housing has been a problem on Hilton Head for years, but a recent threat you may remember is now sparking change.

As hundreds of people’s leases were nearly terminated, town leaders say they realized action needed to be taken immediately to address the issue.

In response to the panic caused at Chimney Cove, Hilton Head’s mayor asked town staff to begin work on an affordable housing framework.

After weeks of effort, that framework was presented at a public meeting Tuesday with direct action to come.

As explained by the consultants, a group of 35 islanders from various backgrounds talked through what this proposal should include.

They came up with a framework that is..

”Built upon four main pillars: community, planning, management, and revenue to create a housing framework that will be sustainable and have action,” Community Planning Manager Missy Luick said.

”There were two council members in that discussion as well, David Ames and Tom Lennox.

”It outlines strategies and action steps that give the town manager permission to move ahead, and I think that’s the bottom line,” District 3, Town Councilman David Ames said.

Tuesday’s meeting was packed with members of the public, who said one after the other how important it is for the town to take action and fix affordable housing.

This plan is detailed with several goals and strategies to do so.

”We’re going to establish a staff member dedicated to housing, that’s critical.We’re going to create a community advisory group that gets together to meet about housing.”

To do any of that, council will have to approve it first something Ames thinks will happen.

”The plan has a lot of the words commitment and commit in it and I think that’s what this council is ready to do.”

The four pillars, or goals, discussed today at this meeting and detailed in this report will be presented to town Council one week from Tuesday first at their meeting on Nov. 1.

At that point it’ll be put to a vote for them to approve or deny this plan.

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