Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in Greenville, SC

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Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in Greenville or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

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Medicare Greenville, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

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What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Greenville, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Greenville

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans Greenville, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Greenville is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in Greenville, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans Greenville, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance Greenville, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in Greenville. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare Greenville, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance Greenville, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage Greenville, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in Greenville, SC

High school football roundup: Greer to Mann, what happened in Week 4 in Greenville area

Here is how Greenville area high school football teams fared on Friday night. See a roundup of all the action here:Hillcrest 37, Powdersville 35: The Rams held off Powdersville's late comeback attempt with a first-down conversion by Bennett Judy in the games final minute. Judy completed passes to eight different receivers and four receivers scored touchdowns for Hillcrest as they're 5-0 on the year.Travelers Rest 35, Eastside 28: Zane Saunders and Ethan Fasuyi each had 12 total t...

Here is how Greenville area high school football teams fared on Friday night. See a roundup of all the action here:

Hillcrest 37, Powdersville 35: The Rams held off Powdersville's late comeback attempt with a first-down conversion by Bennett Judy in the games final minute. Judy completed passes to eight different receivers and four receivers scored touchdowns for Hillcrest as they're 5-0 on the year.

Travelers Rest 35, Eastside 28: Zane Saunders and Ethan Fasuyi each had 12 total tackles for Eastside (2-3). Kalvin Banks scored three rushing touchdowns and Baron Leonard caught a touchdown. Andrew Moree had an interception for the Eagles too. Travelers Rest moved to 2-3 on the year with the win.

Pendleton 43, Fountain Inn 0: Pendleton continued its strong start to the season and is now 3-1. Fountain Inn fell to 0-4.

Wade Hampton 35, Blue Ridge 25: Cooper Tankersley continued his streak of 100+ rushing yard and 150+ passing yard games. He also threw three touchdown passes. Wade Hampton (3-2) has now won three games for the first time since 2017. Blue Ridge (2-3) has dropped three games in a row since starting 2-0.

Boiling Springs 27, Greer 25: After Chase Byrd scored off a Josh Runion pass with 4:25 left in the game, Boiling Springs stopped a two-point conversion attempt by the Yellow Jackets on a Bryce Foster run to hang and win. Byrd finished with seven catches for 33 yards and a score. Runion was 14-of-22 passing for 101 yards and a touchdown. Chris Hall also scored for the 'Jackets.

Southside 31, Carolina 2: Southside (2-2) got back to .500 with a commanding win over Carolina. The Trojans (2-3) fell back under .500 as both teams head toward region play.

Easley 36, Woodmont 17: Easley (3-1) finished 5-5 last season and is now 7-3 in its last ten games dating back to last season. Woodmont (3-2) dropped its second game of the year and has now lost two in a row to Easley. Tre Boughton rushed for over 100 yards and scored twice on the ground for the Wildcats.

Greenville 49, J.L. Mann 6: Tyler Brown, Mazeo Bennett and Luke Krall all had touchdown receptions for Greenville. Brown had three receptions for 76 yards, Krall had six catches for 84 and Bennett broke the 100 receiving yard mark. Jayvion Sherman and Jayden Pepper each scored rushing touchdowns. Keyshawn Robinson intercepted Mann QB Ethan Anderson twice. Anderson was 22-of-39 passing for 282 yards, a touchdown and four interceptions. Jordan Meggett had a 49 touchdown reception to open the games scoring.

Spartanburg 59, Riverside 25: Spartanburg got back on track to improve to 2-3 on the year and Riverside fell to 1-4 on the year.

Laurens 45, Union County 14: Laurens (1-4) handed Union County its second loss of the season.

Christ Church 73, Calhoun Falls 0: Dashun Reeder scored three rushing touchdowns and BJ Atkins scored a rushing touchdown and returned a punt 45 yards for a score for Christ Church. The Cavaliers improved to 1-0 in region play and are now 3-1 on the year.

St. Joseph's Catholic 55, Ware Shoals 0: Five different players (CJ Johnson, Walker Wood, William Gillespie, Brayden Johnson and Johnny Jaraczewski) carried the football for St. Joseph's Catholic and each scored a rushing touchdown as the No. 1 ranked Knights (5-0) remained undefeated. CJ Johnson led St. Joe with 97 rushing yards in the game and Brayden Johnson scored two rushing touchdowns.

Broome 39, Berea 7

Westside 34, Mauldin 7

Joe Dandron covers high school sports and more for The Greenville News. Contact him at jdandron@greenvillenews.com, follow him on Twitter: @JoeMDandron.

Elections in Greenville County: New early voting in SC and what else to know in 2022

Election Day comes Nov. 8 as local, state and federal offices are up for grabs when voters take to the polls, but voters in South Carolina don't have to wait until November to cast their ballots.Because of a new law passed earlier this year, voters in South Carolina can vote in person any time from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and Saturdays between Oct. 24 and Nov. 8. They need ...

Election Day comes Nov. 8 as local, state and federal offices are up for grabs when voters take to the polls, but voters in South Carolina don't have to wait until November to cast their ballots.

Because of a new law passed earlier this year, voters in South Carolina can vote in person any time from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. on weekdays and Saturdays between Oct. 24 and Nov. 8. They need only show up with a photo ID or voter-registration card at an early voting center in their county of residence.

In Greenville County, those early voting centers are:

Of course, early voters, like others, must be registered to vote. It requires state-issued identification. Voters must be registered at least 30 days prior to an election in order to vote in that election.

You can register to vote online at scvotes.gov, in person at the Greenville County elections office on University Ridge or by mail at 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville SC, 29601. You can also call 864-467-7250 for more information.

Here's more you should know about this year's general election:

Voter guide:A guide to voter rights in South Carolina. What you need to know before you cast a ballot

Related:Early voting is biggest expansion of voting rights in recent South Carolina history

Absentee voting in SC

Voters who want to cast absentee ballots must request an application from their local election office by phone, mail or in person. Applicants must provide their name, date of birth and last four digits of their Social Security number.

Voters will be mailed their ballots, and the ballots must be returned to their local election office between Oct. 24 and Nov. 5 before 5 p.m. prior to Election Day. Voters must present a photo ID when returning the ballot to the office.

When to vote on Election Day

Voting on Nov. 8 runs from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., though anyone in line at 7 p.m. will be allowed to vote no matter how long it takes them to cast their ballot.

Where to vote in Greenville County

Greenville County will have 144 precincts open for voting that Tuesday. Visit scvotes.sc.gov for a full list of polling places, or call the election office at 864-467-7250.

To find your individual polling place using your name and birthday, visit scvotes.sc.gov.

Who's on the ballot in SC

Every registered voter in the nation can vote in races like presidential elections. Anyone in South Carolina can vote in races like for governor and the state's U.S. Senate election. For local races, however, where elected officials represent residents of distinct areas within the bounds of the state, voting eligibility is determined by location of residence.

Some races cross county and city lines.

To know the races and candidates on your specific ballot ahead of time, visit scvotes.gov, where you can type in your name, birthday and county to see a sample ballot.

Races on the ballot in Greenville County for 2022 election

Governor and Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina

Secretary of State

State Treasurer

Attorney General of South Carolina

Comptroller General

State Superintendent of Education

Commissioner of Agriculture

U.S. Senate

U.S. House of Representatives, District 3

U.S. House of Representatives, District 4

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 5

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 7

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 10

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 16

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 17

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 18

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 19

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 20

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 21

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 22

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 23

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 24

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 25

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 27

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 28

South Carolina House of Representatives, District 35

Solicitor, Circuit 13

Probate Judge

Auditor

County Treasurer

Greenville County Council, District 17

Greenville County Council, District 19

Greenville County Council, District 23

Greenville County Council, District 26

Greenville County Council, District 28

Soil and Water District Commission

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 18

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 20

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 22

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 24

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 26

Greenville County School Board of Trustees, District 28

Watershed Conservation District, Rabon Creek

Watershed Conservation District, South Tyger River

Fire District Commissioner, Dunklin Fire District

Fire District Commissioner, Piedmont Public Service Area

Tamia Boyd is a Michigan native who covers breaking news in Greenville. Email her at tboyd@gannett.com, and follow her on Twitter @tamiamb.

Highly contagious rabbit virus detected for first time in SC after sudden die-off of rabbits in Greenville County

CLEMSON, S.C. —The sudden die-off of feral rabbits in Greenville has prompted a warning from animal health care authorities.The Clemson University Veterinary Diagnostic Center said the dead animals were tested in Columbia and diagnosed with Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Type-2 (RHDV2).The diagnosis was confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).This is the first time RHDV2 has been detected in South Carolina, according t...

CLEMSON, S.C. —

The sudden die-off of feral rabbits in Greenville has prompted a warning from animal health care authorities.

The Clemson University Veterinary Diagnostic Center said the dead animals were tested in Columbia and diagnosed with Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Type-2 (RHDV2).

The diagnosis was confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).

This is the first time RHDV2 has been detected in South Carolina, according to the center.

Officials say the surviving rabbits at the location have been quarantined, and animal health authorities have asked the owners to contain them in hutches to avoid further spread and to prevent further contact with wild rabbits.

“RHDV2’s mortality rate is 70% or higher. Our goal at this point is to do what we can to prevent the virus from spreading into the wild rabbit population and potentially further infecting domesticated rabbits,” said Michael Neault, State Veterinarian and director of Clemson University Livestock Poultry Health (LPH).

Clinical signs of the virus include sudden death, anorexia, lethargy, conjunctivitis, respiratory signs and bloodstained noses or mouths.

RHDV2 is a highly contagious Calicivirus that affects domestic rabbits, wild or feral rabbits and hares. The virus is shed by infected rabbits and transmitted through direct contact, bedding, water, feed, hay and other materials used in the care and feeding of rabbits. It can also be spread by insects and human contact.

Neault says while RHDV2 does not impact human health, it has a high fatality rate among domestic and wild rabbits and has become endemic in the Western U.S. There is no live test for RHDV2.

“The introduction of RHDV2 to wild rabbits in South Carolina poses a serious threat to wild populations and has contributed to significant mortality events in the western United States. It is important that we do what we can to prevent contact between infected feral rabbits and wild rabbits,” said Will Dillman, Assistant Chief of Wildlife for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The USDA recommends the following biosecurity practices:

If your rabbit becomes ill or dies and you suspect RHDV2, please contact your veterinarian.

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South Carolina football report card: No surprise offense gets F, but coaching gets a D

COLUMBIA — South Carolina football's 48-7 loss to No. 2 Georgia on Saturday was one of the biggest failures in program history.It was the worst loss for the Gamecocks (1-2, 0-2 SEC) in their 128-year series with the Bulldogs (3-0,1-0). The previous worst margin of defeat was 40 points.He...

COLUMBIA — South Carolina football's 48-7 loss to No. 2 Georgia on Saturday was one of the biggest failures in program history.

It was the worst loss for the Gamecocks (1-2, 0-2 SEC) in their 128-year series with the Bulldogs (3-0,1-0). The previous worst margin of defeat was 40 points.

Here's how we graded the performance at Williams-Brice Stadium:

Offense: F

Unless South Carolina gets the turnovers under control, this season could quickly become a disaster. Spencer Rattler threw two interceptions, both at critical moments: one the second drive of the game and one the second drive after halftime. Both were directly to covered receivers.

The Georgia defense is among the best in the country, so it wasn't a surprise to see the offense struggle, but it was disappointing how non-competitive it looked. The Gamecocks couldn't even get into field goal range with a kicker that completed two over 50 yards in Week 1. There were also plenty of wasted opportunities: The offense went three-and-out after a shanked punt put it in excellent field position, and nothing came of a well-executed fake punt either.

Defense: D

The defense did what they could, but they were outmatched at every position. The Gamecocks were missing five defensive starters due to injuries, and nickelback Cam Smith's backup David Spaulding was also out.

The freshman-laden secondary held its own against the Bulldogs' passing game, but sophomore tight end Brock Bowers was a problem throughout the game, finishing with 121 receiving yards and three touchdowns. The Gamecocks again struggled to contain the run, allowing 208 yards.

Special teams: A

Special teams coordinator Pete Lembo loves a trick play, and it worked again against the Bulldogs. Punter Kai Kroeger threw a pass on the play in the first quarter for a first down, and he's now 3-of-3 passing in his career. Kroeger also hit all five of his punts inside the 20-yard line and logged a longest punt of 54 yards.

Other than that, the unit didn't get to show much. Kicker Mitch Jeter saw the field for a single extra point, which he made.

Coaching: D

There were some bizarre choices in Marcus Satterfield's offensive play-calling. He ran several rushing plays in third down and long situations, one with Dakereon Joyner at quarterback, even though the Gamecocks have consistently struggled in the run game. Both of Rattler's interceptions were on the same receiver routes.

At least coach Shane Beamer made the smart decision to pull Rattler in the fourth quarter to prevent an injury.

Overall: D

If it wasn't for Kai Kroeger, the Gamecocks would have earned a failing grade. This was an embarrassing loss to a conference rival in front of a large group of high-priority recruits visiting Williams-Brice Stadium. There are very few positive takeaways.

Contact Emily Adams at eaadams@gannett.com or on Twitter @eaadams6.

Lawsuit against Rockstar Cheer in South Carolina names more coaches, says abuse was repeatedly reported

GREER, S.C. —The attorneys who filed the federal lawsuit against Rockstar Cheer in South Carolina have expanded the lawsuit, adding multiple new accusers and naming multiple coaches.This story began on Aug. 22 when Scott Foster, the owner and founder of Rockstar Cheerleading and Dance in Greer, died by suicide.To see a timeline of this story scroll to the bottom of this story. On Sept. 1, the Strom Law Firm filed the first federal lawsuit against Rockstar Cheer, the late Scott Foste...

GREER, S.C. —

The attorneys who filed the federal lawsuit against Rockstar Cheer in South Carolina have expanded the lawsuit, adding multiple new accusers and naming multiple coaches.

This story began on Aug. 22 when Scott Foster, the owner and founder of Rockstar Cheerleading and Dance in Greer, died by suicide.

To see a timeline of this story scroll to the bottom of this story.

On Sept. 1, the Strom Law Firm filed the first federal lawsuit against Rockstar Cheer, the late Scott Foster, his wife Kathy Foster and several other entities, according to attorneys with the Strom Law Firm. In a news release, the attorneys said the lawsuit outlines "a sordid conspiracy of sexual abuse and billion dollar profits."

To read the full lawsuit, click here.

On Thursday, attorneys expanded that federal lawsuit, adding multiple new accusers and naming new defendants.

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"The amended lawsuit details the stomach-turning abuse by multiple coaches and includes several instances where athletes were transported across state lines and abused at events sanctioned by Varsity Spirit and the U.S. All Star Federation, both of whom have ignored repeated calls to launch a comprehensive investigation into their competitive environment and how this abuse could have occurred," a news release from the law firm said.

The attorneys said, despite the lawsuits and investigation, Varsity Spirit, the USASF and Bain Capital have continued to operate without instituting any safety reforms to protect athletes from physical, mental and sexual abuse even scheduling new events as the growing scandal gains national prominence.

Attorneys said allegations of abuse were reported to the USASF but were disregarded.

“Not only were they turning a blind eye to a few isolated incidents happening, but they were actually creating an environment where this type of abuse could be perpetuated, where it could grow, where it could take place in gyms all over the place, frankly,” Attorney Alexandra Benevento said.

“For Varsity Spirit, the USASF and Bain Capital, these survivors didn’t matter, Attorney Bakari Sellers said in the release. "Their checks did. They did nothing to stop this abuse then and they’re doing nothing now.”

“Imagine the courage it takes for a rape survivor to report her abuse,” Attorney Jessica Fickling said in the release. “And how did Varsity Spirit and the USASF reward that courage? They dismissed her, called her a liar and told her she should find another gym. For the defendants, the almighty dollar was far more valuable than the future of these athletes.”

The new lawsuit names Kenny Feeley, Josh Guyton, Christopher Hinton, Nathan Allan Plant, Traevon Black, Peter Holley and lists them all as coaches. Click here to view a copy of the amended lawsuit.

Attorneys said the alleged abuse happened for years in Greenville, at the homes of Foster and other coaches and in hotels at competitions, some of which were sanctioned by Varsity Brands and USASF.

“This wasn’t just a cover up," Benevento said. "This wasn’t just people being lazy or not paying attention. This was an effort to create an environment where children could be abused and where entities worked together with one another to perpetuate it, to hide it, to minimize it and then to monetize it.”

The lawsuit also goes after the reporting methods for abuse within these organizations.

“Not only were they discouraged from coming forward, but when they did so, the way that it was done was essentially to create as many barriers to a full report as possible," Fickling said.

In a news release about the amended lawsuit, Sellers also said this case involves "repeated abuse that was reported to everyone including the Greenville County Sheriff's Department."

Thursday night, the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office released a statement in response to being named in the lawsuit.

"The GCSO has not received any complaint about Scott Foster or sexual abuse occurring at rock star cheer. The only matter we investigated was his death investigation. The Department of Homeland Security is the agency investigating that matter, and how they received the complaint, would have to come from them, but the sheriff’s office has not received any such complaint. We have one of the absolute best Crimes Against Children’s Unit and ICAC unit’s in the country, and rest assured if a complaint of that nature was brought to our attention and occurred within our jurisdiction, we would be conducting an extensive, thorough and timely investigation.”

Click here to view a copy of the amended lawsuit.

Attorney Alexandra Benevento said more lawsuits are coming, which she said will name new perpetrators and gyms in various jurisdictions across the country.

“We’re looking at abuse that dates back two decades or more all across this nation,” said Benevento. “It’s impossible that Varsity Spirit, the USASF and Bain Capital didn’t know it was happening. We want to give safety back to these athletes and make sure this never happens again.”

Rockstar Cheer is a franchised gym. It has several locations across the country. Last month, several locations announced that they would be dropping their licensing agreements with the brand.

Aug. 22: The Greenville County Coroner's Office said Scott Foster, 49, died by suicide in his vehicle at Paris Mountain State Park. Foster was the owner and found of Rockstar Cheerleading and Dance in Greer. More here.

Aug. 29: Cheerleading and dance gyms across the country announced they're dropping their licensing agreements with Rockstar Cheer, according to a letter posted on Facebook. More here.

Aug. 30: A civil lawsuit was filed against the late Scott Foster and Rockstar Cheer and Dance, according to a filing in the Greenville County court system. Attorneys James C. Sproat of Columbia and James W. Bannister, of Greenville, filed the lawsuit on behalf of an anonymous plaintiff from Greenville. The lawsuit also names Varsity Spirit, the United States All Star Federation, and The National Center for Safety Initiatives as defendants. More here.

Sept. 1: A federal lawsuit was filed against Rockstar Cheer, the late Scott Foster, his wife Kathy Foster and several other entities, according to attorneys with the Strom Law Firm. In a release, the attorneys said the lawsuit outlines "a sordid conspiracy of sexual abuse and billion dollar profits." To read the full lawsuit, click here.

Sept. 7: Rockstar Cheerleading and Dance in Greer announces its closing following the death of its owner and two lawsuits, which include claims of sexual abuse by cheerleading coaches and the late owner.

Sept. 15: Attorneys with the Strom Law Firm expanded the federal lawsuit they filed earlier this month, adding multiple new survivors and naming new abusers, including Kenny Feeley. To read the full amended lawsuits, click here.

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