Senior Medicare Advantage plan insurance in Daniel Island, SC

Ask us Anything

843-991-2695

Quick Quote

Helping Seniors Make Better-Informed Medicare Decisions

Trying to pick a health insurance plan can be a chore for anyone. For many people, just mentioning the word "open enrollment" sends shivers down the spine. It seems like there's always a nagging feeling that you're wasting money, choosing a plan with poor in-network care, or both. One would think that health insurance gets easier as you approach retirement age, but the truth is that picking an initial Medicare coverage plan can be daunting.

Unfortunately, the confusing process of signing up for Medicare causes many seniors to forego healthcare coverage altogether. After all, Medicare enrollment can involve several federal agencies, including the Social Security Administration (or SSA) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (or CMS).

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, our passion is guiding seniors through the confusion of Medicare. That way, they can enjoy retirement with peace of mind knowing they are protected and ready for life after 65. We work with dozens of insurance companies, giving our clients the chance to choose a plan that best fits their lifestyle.

We choose to design our senior insurance plans with a focus on optimal benefits structure, lower costs, and personalized service. Some independent insurance agencies see their aging customers as nothing more than a financial transaction waiting to happen. In contrast, we treat each of our clients with respect and dignity as we help them navigate the confusing waters of Medicare. Combined with individualized service, we help older Americans make well-informed decisions about insurance. Whether you're in need of senior Medicare Supplement Plan insurance in Daniel Island or simply have questions about signing up for Medicare, our team is here to help.

Service Areas

Medicare Daniel Island, SC

Guiding You Through The Confusion of Medicare!

Request a Consultation

What is Medicare?

If you're approaching the golden years of your life, it's important you understand what Medicare is if you don't already.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program reserved for people older than 65 who have worked full-time for at least ten years. The Medicare program is paid for by a combination of worker payroll tax, premiums paid by Medicare enrollees, and the U.S. government.

There are four parts of Medicare:

 Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Daniel Island, SC

This type of Medicare is free for most U.S. citizens. Medicare Part A helps older adults pay for care in a nursing facility, hospital visits, and some forms of in-home senior care.

This tier costs around $100 per month. It covers different outpatient services like lab tests, preventative care, doctor's visits, mental health care, clinical trials, and some forms of surgery.

This type of Medicare is most often called Medicare Advantage. This tier of Medicare allows seniors to choose health plans provided by insurance companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Individuals who use Medicare Advantage commonly use Medicare supplement plan insurance to help pay for health care costs that Original Medicare won't cover, like coinsurance, deductibles, and copayments.

Sometimes called "PDPs," these plans add drug coverage to standard Medicare, some Medicare Private Fee-for-Service Plans (PFFS), some Medicare Cost Plans, and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans (MSA).

The amount of money you pay for your health care depends on several factors, including:

At Senior Medicare Insurance Services, we offer a number of health insurance solutions for seniors. Two of our most used services include Medicare Advantage plan insurance and Medicare supplement plan insurance.

Senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Daniel Island

Sometimes called Medigap, the purpose of Medicare Supplement Insurance is to help fill in "gaps" that might not be covered by Original Medicare. You can think of a Medigap policy as a supplement for your Original Medicare benefits.

Private companies like Senior Medicare Insurance Services sell this type of insurance right here in South Carolina. While Original Medicare will pay for much of the cost associated with health care services you need, it may not cover all of your expenses. Generally, Medigap policies do not cover costs stemming from eyeglasses, private-duty nurses, dental care, hearing aids, or long-term care.

Depending on the Medicare Supplement Plan that you choose, it may cover out-of-the-country medical services when you travel abroad. Assuming you have Original Medicare coverage, your policy will cover its share of Medicare-approved health care costs. Once your Original Medicare coverage reaches its limit, your Medigap policy will pay its share of the fees.

Our Medigap policies are drafted to meet your specific needs, and can help cover remaining health care costs such as:

Deductibles

Copayments

Coinsurance

Important Information About Senior Supplement Plan Insurance

To dispel some confusion, you should know that a Medigap policy is not the same as a Medicare Advantage Plan. The latter helps you receive Medicare benefits, while the former supplements the benefits you obtain through your Original Medicare plan. As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

 Senior Medicare Plans Daniel Island, SC

As you begin to explore Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, keep the following important information in mind:

  • To qualify for a Medigap policy, you must first have Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B.
  • Payments on your Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan will be made to the private insurance company that you choose, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. These payments are made every month and are paid in addition to the monthly payment you make for Medicare Part B.
  • If you are the holder of a Medicare Advantage Plan, it is illegal for an insurance company to sell you a senior Medicare Supplement Policy. If you plan on switching back to an Original Medicare plan, you may be able to purchase a Medigap policy.
  • If you have health problems as you age, your standardized Medigap policy is guaranteed to be renewable. So long as you pay your monthly premium, your insurance provider cannot cancel your policy.
  • Medigap policies only cover one person. If you have a spouse or family member that would like coverage, they must purchase a separate policy.
  • You may only buy a Senior Medicare Supplement Plan from an insurance agent that is licensed to sell them in your state. Senior Medicare Insurance Services has been licensed to sell Medigap policies in South Carolina for years. We have helped countless seniors get the Medicare coverage they need and continue to do so to this day.
  • In the past, Medigap policies were able to cover costs related to prescription drugs. As of January 1st, 2006, prescription drug coverage is not available on Medicare Supplement Plans. The best way to get coverage for your prescription drugs is to join a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan, often called Part D. Contact our office today to learn more about paying premiums on Medigap and Medicare plans.

For many people, the best time to buy senior Medicare Supplement Plan Insurance in Daniel Island is during the 7 months Medigap Open Enrollment Period. This period starts the day you turn 65 years old, so long as you hold Medical Insurance (Medicare Part B). Generally, during the enrollment period, you get more policy choices and better pricing. Once the enrollment period is over, you may not be able to purchase a Medigap policy. Contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services today to determine if you qualify for a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan.

Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance in Daniel Island, SC

A Medicare Advantage Plan is a kind of Medicare health coverage designed to provide seniors with all their Part A and Part B Medicare benefits. Many Medicare Advantage Plans will often include coverage of the following:

 Medicare Plans Daniel Island, SC

In addition, most Medicare Advantage Plans give seniors coverage for their prescription drug needs. When you enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan through Senior Medicare Insurance Services, your Medicare benefits are covered through your plan and will not be paid for by traditional Medicare.

How Medicare Advantage Plans Work

Sometimes called "MA Plans" or "Part C," Medicare Advantage Plans are considered an "all in one" solution to Original Medicare. Senior Medicare Advantage Plans are only offered by private companies that are approved, like Senior Medicare Insurance Services. Seniors who enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan are still on Medicare. However, these individuals enjoy bundled plans that give seniors the benefits of hospital insurance (Medicare Part A), medical insurance (Medicare Part B), and sometimes drug coverage (Part D).

Medicare Advantage Plans are very popular because they cover all Medicare services and make life a little easier for seniors who have trouble understanding the nuances of Medicare.

When you contact Senior Medicare Insurance Services to choose your Medicare Advantage Plan, ask your agent about Medicare prescription drug coverage. Unless you already have drug coverage (Part D), you should seriously consider Part D coverage to help reduce costs associated with prescription drugs. You may also want to consider a Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan to help fill gaps in coverage that Original Medicare will not cover.

 Senior Health Insurance Daniel Island, SC

Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance Rules

Medicare works by paying a set amount of money to the companies that offer senior Medicare Advantage Plan insurance in Daniel Island. That money is used to pay for the care services that you need. Because Medicare Advantage Plans are different, you should expect out-of-pocket costs to vary depending on the plan you choose.

Different plans have different rules for how you receive services, such as:

  • If you must go to facilities, suppliers, or doctors that belong to your Advantage Plan for non-urgent and non-emergency care.
  • Whether you must get a referral to see a specialized doctor
 Healthcare Daniel Island, SC

Companies that offer Medicare Advantage Plans must follow strict rules, which are set by Medicare and can change every year.

Paying for Your Senior Medicare Advantage Plan Insurance

How much you pay for your Medicare Advantage Plan varies and depends on a few different factors. In most cases, if you need a kind of medical service, you will need to rely on the doctors and providers in your plan's service area and network to pay the lowest amounts. In some cases, if you choose to use a service outside of your plan's network of coverage, you may have to pay out-of-pocket.

We encourage you to contact our office today to learn more about Medicare Advantage Plans, how they work, what your options are, and how often you will have to pay out-of-pocket, if at all.

 Burial Insurance Daniel Island, SC

The Senior Medicare Insurance Services Commitment

Since our company was founded, we have led the insurance industry by providing our clients with the most valuable, helpful insurance solutions available. We are fully committed to our current and prospective clients by:

  • Choosing to focus on personalized, one-on-one service. When you work with our team, know that we will always design your health insurance plan with your best interests in mind.
  • Listening to your specific needs.
  • Responding to all inquiries and questions promptly and with a friendly attitude.
  • Providing you with the best customer service in the senior health insurance industry, whether you have questions or are ready to move forward with a Medicare plan.
 Medicare Advantage Daniel Island, SC

Our mission is to help give seniors the best Medicare assistance available so that they may understand the Medicare process and make an informed health coverage decision. We have the knowledge, skills, and experience to assist anyone interested in Medicare. Our personal goal is to become a lifetime resource for our clients and give them greater confidence in choosing their insurance plans.

Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Cainhoy farm seeks single-family residential zoning

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.Jan. 12: A site plan for Hawthorne at Clements Ferry Road, a 210-unit multifamily development on 11 acres at 2800 Clements Ferry Rd.A preliminary subdivision plat and road construction...

This week there are a large number of multifamily and large residential developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as the application results for specific items to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.

Jan. 12: A site plan for Hawthorne at Clements Ferry Road, a 210-unit multifamily development on 11 acres at 2800 Clements Ferry Rd.

A preliminary subdivision plat and road construction plans for Del Webb Entrance Road, a new public road on 11 acres on Clements Ferry Road.

Jan. 4: Request a variance to allow the removal of one grand tree at 15 Surr St. on Daniel Island. Results: Pending.

Jan. 5: A site plan for Woodfield Daniel Island 3, a 163-unit multifamily development on 6 acres at 2058 Benefitfocus Way. Results: Pending final documentation to Zoning, T&T and MS4. Once approved, submit Site Plan to Zoning for stamping.

Jan. 10: An ordinance to rezone 10.32 acres at 638 Tuxbury Farm Road and two adjacent parcels on Tuxbury Farm Road in Cainhoy to single-family residential zoning. The property is owned by Ray and Angela Waits. Results: Pending.

An ordinance to rezone 5.71 acres at 715 Yaupon Drive & 2682 Highway 41 in Cainhoy to diverse residential zoning. The property is owned by Rumphs Auto Service et al. Results: Pending.

Berkeley Co. Bd. of Education meets twice each month. Executive Committee meets at 5:30 p.m.; meeting starts at 6:30 p.m.

Berkeley Co. Council meets fourth Mon. of each month, 6 p.m., Berkeley County Admin. Blg., 1003 Hwy 52, Moncks Corner.

City of Charleston Council typically meets the second and fourth Tues. of each month, 5 p.m., City Hall, 80 Broad Street, Charleston, SC and/or virtually via Conference Call #1-929-205-6099; Access Code: 912 096 416. Exceptions: Summer Schedule - 3rd Tues. of June, July, and August; December meetings on the 1st and 3rd Tues. Dates and locations subject to change.

City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meets every Thurs. at 9 a.m.via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Site Design meets the 1st Wed. of each month at 5 p.m. via Zoom.

City of Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals – Zoning meets the 1st and 3rd Tues. of each month at 5:15 p.m., except for January and July when no meeting is held on the 1st Tues.

City of Charleston Design Review Board meets the 1st and 3rd Mon. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Planning Commission meets the 3rd Wed. of every month at 5 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Large projects meets the 2nd and 4th Wed. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

City of Charleston Board of Architectural Review – Small projects meets the 2nd and 4th Thurs. of every month at 4:30 p.m.

All meetings are open for public comment except the City of Charleston Technical Review Committee meetings.

For more information, contacts for specific projects and on location and time of the meetings or to learn more, visit charleston-sc.gov/AgendaCenter/.

Non-profit Briefs - January 19, 2023

Charleston Playhouse announces Broadway Cabaret Series Season Charleston Playhouse, Charleston’s first Professional Equity Theatre Company, announced its 2023 Broadway Cabaret Series Season. After a very successful 2022 season, the slate in 2023 will feature Broadway performers Darilyn Castillo (“Hamilton,” “The Lion King,”“Motown the Musical”), Hayley Podschun (Glinda in “Wicked,” “Hello Dolly!”, “Something Rotten!,” “Chaplin,&...

Charleston Playhouse announces Broadway Cabaret Series Season

Charleston Playhouse, Charleston’s first Professional Equity Theatre Company, announced its 2023 Broadway Cabaret Series Season. After a very successful 2022 season, the slate in 2023 will feature Broadway performers Darilyn Castillo (“Hamilton,” “The Lion King,”

“Motown the Musical”), Hayley Podschun (Glinda in “Wicked,” “Hello Dolly!”, “Something Rotten!,” “Chaplin,” “Anything Goes,” “Pal Joey,” “Sunday in the Park with George,” “Hairspray,” “The Sound of Music”), Jenny DiNoia (Elphaba in “Wicked” in seven companies across four countries, more than any other actress in the show’s history, including Broadway, London, Chicago, Seoul, Sydney, and the first and second national tours), Jenny Lee Stern (“Rocky, A Christmas Story”), and local professionals Clyde Moser, Aaron Hancock, and Lauren Wagner. Tickets can be purchased at CharlestonPlayhouse.com.

Charleston Playhouse, a nonprofit organization in residence at the College of Charleston Sottile Theatre, features Broadway actors, Equity members, and local professional talent. The productions provide top-quality entertainment in the heart of Charleston’s charming historic district. Stars such as Carol Burnett, Kristen Chenoweth, and other Tony Award winners, along with Mayor John Tecklenburg, Daniel Island resident Ed Marinaro, Renee Dobbins Anderson, and many others have joined Charleston Playhouse’s Advisory Committee in support of this endeavor. Doug Coupe, another resident of Daniel Island, is on Charleston Playhouse’s Board of Directors.

Charleston Playhouse, an advocate for the arts and the artists in the community, is also planning its inaugural Mainstage Season, producing four large-scale Broadway-caliber productions in the Sottile Theatre, while continuing to add additional foundational funding and growing its robust donor base leading up to that announcement. Charleston Playhouse will not only be the first professional Equity Theatre in Charleston, but the largest in the state of South Carolina.

Hope Scholars Academy open house to feature new faculty

Hope Scholars Academy has appointed two new faculty members who will be introduced at an open house at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 24.

Rachel Hudson will be teaching 11th grade literature and composition. Hudson has a bachelor of arts in English from Southern Wesleyan University and a master of arts in adolescent literature. She has taught for eight years at the middle school level and served as a mentor for teachers in those grades.

Melissa Bennett will lead classes in Bible for the eighth through 10th grades. Bennett graduated from Geneva College with a bachelor of arts in student ministries. She is currently pursuing her master’s degree at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. She has taught Bible for more than 20 years. Bennett is married to the Reverend Jonathan Bennett; they have three children and are also foster parents.

At the open house, families will have an opportunity to tour the school and meet the new faculty. In addition, the continuing faculty members will be on hand for questions about the full curriculum including science, math, engineering, Bible, world view, art and languages. To sign up, go to hopescholarsacademy.org.

Hope Scholars is located in Cooper River Baptist Church, 1059 Crawford St., in Park Circle near the intersection of I-26 and I-526.

Economist: Expect ‘inevitable’ recession by 2024

Business owners should expect a recession to hit the U.S. economy in the first half of 2024, a Daniel Island economist said during an annual economic forecast in December.Stephen Slifer, a former chief economist for Lehman Brothers and former senior economist for the Federal Reserve, told hundreds of business owners, professionals and government officials in Charleston that the national economy continues to remain strong even with rising inflation fears and a looming recession.“The stock market has gotten whacked pretty g...

Business owners should expect a recession to hit the U.S. economy in the first half of 2024, a Daniel Island economist said during an annual economic forecast in December.

Stephen Slifer, a former chief economist for Lehman Brothers and former senior economist for the Federal Reserve, told hundreds of business owners, professionals and government officials in Charleston that the national economy continues to remain strong even with rising inflation fears and a looming recession.

“The stock market has gotten whacked pretty good this year,” he said. “Yet, the economy keeps hanging in there.”

If a recession does come in 2024, businesses could experience a recovery during the second half of that year, he said.

Slifer, who writes a column for SC Biz publications and operates a data analytics firm in Charleston, said several indicators that economists watch are predicting a recession.

“When are we expecting some sort of a recession?” Slifer said. “I don’t want to oversimplify this, but there’s a couple of things that I’m looking at. There's all sorts of leading indicators.”

Slifer said the real funds rate and the yield curve, along with specific federal policy changes, give economists a reason to think a recession will occur in 2024.

The real funds rate is essentially the real interest rate with a subtraction for inflation, which indicates the actual cost of borrowing money and what a lender might expect as a return for lending money. Along with the real funds rate, Slifer said economists also look for an inverted yield curve.

“It’s just the difference between long rates and short rates,” Slifer said. “Usually, long rates are higher than short rates, so the thing slopes upward. But then the Fed comes along and they start raising rates up, up, up, up, up, go short rates. Eventually short rates get to be higher than long rates and now the curve shows slopes downward. That’s known as an inverted yield curve.”

Slifer said that an inverted yield curve is typically a sign that Fed policy has become “too tight.” He said historically, going back about 50 years, when economists detect an inverted yield curve, a recession is about one year away.

“So both of my warning signals are telling me that something is going to happen by the middle of next year, so for that reason I’m looking for a recession in the first half of 2024,” Slifer said, adding, “No recession for now, but I think it’s inevitable.”

In a year that saw continually rising interest rates, inflation, a battered stock market and late-year massive layoffs, particularly in the tech sector, Slifer’s annual economic forecast sold out.

With several questions coming about federal policy, student loan forgiveness and the status of entitlements such as Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, federal pensions, including veterans’ benefits, he said the U.S. needs to do better with its monetary policy, including finding the political will to deal with looming insolvency issues with some of those programs. He said the Obama Administration had a possible plan in hand that could have tackled these issues but decided against going forward. He said given the division in Washington, it’s unlikely any lawmakers would have the will to take on such thorny, difficult and costly issues.

Slifer said the status of the economy, with ever rising inflation but not a residual reduction in spending, can be found in the data and monetary policy decisions. Because inflation is tied to the real funds rate as an indicator of a recession, understanding how to navigate and mitigate that could become critical to emerging from an economic downturn.

“The last couple of years, I think that fiscal and monetary policy that we’ve got in this country has gone seriously off track,” Slifer said.

He said our current monetary issues can be traced back to a government overreaction beginning in March and April 2020 with shutdowns related to the COVID-19 pandemic and gross domestic product dropping 30% for the quarter.

“In dollar terms, that’s about $2.1 trillion, right? And yet it wasn’t consumers, it wasn’t businesspeople that did any of that. This was on the government. They did it,” Slifer said, referring to the shutdowns. “I think they felt a responsibility to make people whole.”

Slifer said that the first stimulus of $2 trillion might have made sense, but the money kept coming with stimulus payments coming to businesses and individuals, in addition to the federal government buying debt.

By the time the stimulus packages had ended, the $2 trillion in economic aid had nearly quintupled. He said a lot of people likely paid down debt, giving them the ability to spend more now, which has resulted in a strong economy even with rising inflation based on consumer spending and a willingness to go into debt.

“Add it all up, we had $9.5 trillion worth of stimulus for Pete’s Sake,” Slifer said. “We were trying to solve a $2 trillion problem. That just seems like gross overkill to me, and we’re sitting here wondering … ‘I wonder why inflation is so high.’ Well, here’s a start.”

Slifer also said the Fed underestimated the depth and causes of inflation. He said when he was at the Federal Reserve, politics did not figure into Fed policy, and he’s reluctant to say that has been happening now. He said instead he wanted to think it was just a miscalculation based on circumstances that were difficult to predict.

Slifer said the Fed thought inflation initially was just temporary, and said inflation was simply a result of supply disruptions and other things that had taken place during the pandemic. He said they just expected inflation to go away.

“They stuck to that theme for a year and a half,” he said. “They didn’t give up until December of last year, and then they finally said, ‘Uh, oh, you know this inflation is just not as temporary as what we thought. We’ve got a problem here, and by the way, we’re way behind the curve and we’re going to start raising rates.’ The Fed, in my view, was about 18 months too late. That’s a long time.”

Being slow to react to inflation and an overreaction with stimulus payments going through March 2021, even though the pandemic recession ended in April 2020, has had a ripple effect that impacts inflation, fiscal policy, real estate and investments along with difficulties in the labor market, Slifer said.

“It absolutely was totally unnecessary in my view,” Slifer said. “There are consequences to that stuff. That’s why we’re sitting here looking at these really high inflation rates, interest rates have risen dramatically, (and) government debt has exploded.”

One audience member asked if the Charleston area might be somewhat “insulated” from the recession he predicts a year from now considering that the region typically does not to fall as far and bounces back faster than other areas during economic downturns.

Slifer said with the strength of the housing market at different price points and the demographics of the many people who continue to move into the market, he does not expect to see the decline in housing, GDP, and the labor markets that other areas might experience. But he said while there might be a diminished impact for the Charleston region, he said he would not use the word “insulated.”

“Are we going to be insulated and not see (home) prices drop? I don’t think so,” he said, adding, “We are not insulated. We’re going to move in the same direction, but I guess with a lesser degree.”

Berkeley County receives $368k from National Opioid Settlement

Eligible organizations, nonprofits may apply for grantsThe first influx of funds from the $26 billion National Opioid Settlement will help numerous Berkeley County organizations aid people suffering from the addiction crisis.The county received $368,557 as an initial installment from the South Carolina Opioid Recovery Fund through which the state will distribute its settlement share of more than $360 million.“The opioid epidemic is one that has plagued our nation for years, and we are even seeing its harsh effects ...

Eligible organizations, nonprofits may apply for grants

The first influx of funds from the $26 billion National Opioid Settlement will help numerous Berkeley County organizations aid people suffering from the addiction crisis.

The county received $368,557 as an initial installment from the South Carolina Opioid Recovery Fund through which the state will distribute its settlement share of more than $360 million.

“The opioid epidemic is one that has plagued our nation for years, and we are even seeing its harsh effects in our communities here at home,” said Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb in a statement. “Our county agencies such as EMS, Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office, volunteer fire departments, and the Coroner’s Office, as well as local nonprofits, work hard to deal with the effects and combat opioid use locally. County Council and our administration are thankful for this much-needed settlement funding and will ensure it is utilized in a positive, life-changing way for our citizens.”

Eligible organizations and nonprofits have until 5 p.m. on Jan. 31 to apply for the Berkeley County grants. Eligible applicants include organizations and agencies that work directly on the front lines of the opioid epidemic and/or assist in opioid addiction recovery or preventative services.

Funding must be used for one or more of the following approved opioid remediation uses:

· Naloxone or other FDA-approved drug to reverse opioid overdoses;

· Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) distribution and other opioid-related treatment;

· Pregnant and postpartum women;

· Expanding treatment for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS);

· Expansion of warm handoff programs and recovery services;

· Treatment for incarcerated population;

· Prevention programs;

· Expanding syringe service programs; and

· Evidence-based data collection and research analyzing the effectiveness of the abatement strategies within the state.

Organizations can go online here to apply for the grants.

South Carolina is set to receive its National Opioid Settlement funding over the next 18 years. At least 92 percent of these funds will be used to address the opioid crisis across the state. More than $100 million will be disbursed to nonprofits, hospitals, state agencies and other organizations working to help address this epidemic. Funding from the national settlement stems from manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies involved in the opioid process.

Cold snap bursts water pipes across the Lowcountry creating ‘major crisis’ in leaks and flow

Record cold temperatures have burst so many pipes that the Charleston Water System has seen its water flow double, leaving the utility on the verge of asking customers to boil their water.“We’ve seen thousands upon thousands of leaks in customers homes and in their irrigation systems, so we’ve been dying a death of a thousand cuts,” Mike Saia, spokesman for Charleston Water System, said on Dec. 26 in reference to the gallons of spillage pouring out of torn-open pipe sections.“We’re in a major...

Record cold temperatures have burst so many pipes that the Charleston Water System has seen its water flow double, leaving the utility on the verge of asking customers to boil their water.

“We’ve seen thousands upon thousands of leaks in customers homes and in their irrigation systems, so we’ve been dying a death of a thousand cuts,” Mike Saia, spokesman for Charleston Water System, said on Dec. 26 in reference to the gallons of spillage pouring out of torn-open pipe sections.

“We’re in a major crisis that can only end if customers take action to stop leaks,” he said.

The Charleston Water System remains safe but the utility is asking customers to leave their faucets dripping overnight to prevent freezing, disconnect their irrigation systems from the water supply and check for leaks.

Teams are available to help shut off water valves at 843-727-6800, but Saia said wait times for an answer were averaging 30 minutes because of the volume of calls. The calls and responses so far have measured into the hundreds.

Downtown Charleston reached 20 degrees Saturday, breaking a record for Christmas Eve chill set in 1989. The overnight cold is expected to last a few more days, meaning more leak conditions are possible for local customers.

Other areas were in more distress. The town of Ridgeville in Dorchester County issued a precautionary Boil Water Alert until Thursday afternoon because of burst pipes.

Some relief from the cold temperatures should be ahead as overnight lows are expected to rise above freezing in the coming days, with daytime temperatures hovering in the 60s by the weekend.

Charleston Water System has been able to treat enough water to avoid a boil order so far, but it’s dangerously close. The system can treat about 105 million gallons per day. With the leaks, it has been treating more than 100 million gallons a day for the past few days.

Workers who see water leaking from a house are now stopping to turn off the water even if no one is at the home, Saia said. Many vacation rentals or other short-term rental homes may be vacant with no one there to notice a leak, he said.

The projected warmer weather will increase the likelihood of a water main break, Saia said, which could be enough to cause an emergency if the home leaks aren’t stopped.

“We need our customers to do everything in their power to identify these leaks and help us stop them before temperatures rise and the second challenge rears its head,” Saia said.

Area plumbers have had no shortage of work orders. By noon on Dec. 26, the fractured 43-foot pipe underneath a house on Daniel Island was plumber Perry Pickering’s seventh call of the day. He worked from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Christmas Day responding to more than two dozen calls on Christmas Eve.

He’s seen frozen and burst pipes all over the region.

“It’s the worst freeze damage that I’ve seen in my lifetime,” said Pickering, 54-year-old owner of Picks Plumbing in Charleston. “Normally the people closer to the coast like Daniel Island and Mount Pleasant don’t have to worry about it because of the temperatures being a little bit higher coming off of the ocean. But this year it it caught everybody.”

Pickering said the vast majority of broken lines he has seen are on the outside of homes and have no insulation.

Offices at some local water companies were closed Dec. 26. An automated message at Mount Pleasant Waterworks said the utility had lowered water pressure across the system to try to help deal with freezing temperatures.

Pickering’s advice to homeowners was similar to the alert the Charleston Water System sent out over the weekend.

“Moving water does not freeze: leave the lines dripping,” Pickering said. “You need to leave the cold water as well as the hot water dripping because the hot water line, except for the water heater, after a few minutes it gets cold as well and is susceptible to freezing.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.